Study emotional trauma may change gene expression that last for generations

StillPen

MyPTSD Pro
What I mean is... Its my impression (assumption) that the cellular activity resulting from the exposed genes is not protective of the effects of trauma or providing protection against future trauma but actually makes the current experience MORE disturbing than it would otherwise be.
I think it would be worth finishing the article when you are ready, to see if you still agree with your original assumption. My take is that it does not not necessarily make the current experience MORE disturbing, as much as it gives rise to the person actually being born with, or have a higher propensity to have PTSD or depression or any other mentall illness due to the traumatizing experience of the parent or the grandparent passing down the trait through gene expression (what I understand to be "epigenetics", and I may be wrong on that, as I am still learning). For example, my grandfather lived through the great depression here in the United States and World War II, two very potentially traumatizing events, the first of which left many Americans with nothing...No jobs, no way to feed their families. It had a huge impact on that generation. Many families came away from that time saving litterally everything...they would not throw anything away for fear of going into another depression and not having anything again. I can remember as a child, my grandmother and grandfather had two or three of every kitchen appliance, tv's stacked on one another. My Grandfather became and died a severe hoarder. I believe that gene expression was passed down to my father and/ ultimately directly to me and my siblings...we all have a one form of mental illness or another...I've struggled with depression my whole life. The hope in the article is that exposure to a positive, healthy environment can reverse the mental illness. We are NOT destined to continue handing down the activated traumatized gene expression. Again, I may be totally off on my interpretation of the article. I was taught in school that your DNA determined your traits, and that was that. The thought that genes can be activated/deactivated at any point, then that expression passed down to offspring is amazing.
 

Agita Kaput

Policy Enforcement
Sponsor
The hope in the article is that exposure to a positive, healthy environment can reverse the (sic "inherited") mental illness
Thanks, I will.
Thoughts on a father's day -or- a concrete field anecdote for your epigenetic commentary pleasure. 🙂
I told my to be wife I couldn't have kids. She said she felt the same. We got married and had kids.
Made enough money to shield me (potential children) from the ups and downs of life, so...
I have three kids, the second and third came together 🙄 . As predicted, I went down - hard. Still down, many years later.

Anyway - the divorce and distance from the kids?
partially a result of not wanting them to see me "like this."
partially... I think I put a lot of space between me and the kids to protect them.
A therapist recently told me, "you're heroic to put an end to it (the legacy)."
Can I deduce that I may have increased the likelihood of a positive, healthy environment, or the reversal happens somewhere else?
 
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StillPen

MyPTSD Pro
Can I deduce that I may have increased the likelihood of a positive, healthy environment, or the reversal happens somewhere else?
I'm no expert, but I know the life my kids have had for the last five years with their mom suffering severe PTSD episodes has had a negative and maybe traumatic impact on them. So, it is hard for me to say it would have been better for them had I not been around at all. Yours may have a chance at a more stable environment with you out of the picture but there are SO many factors at play it is very hard to say. It is hard, either way. I tell my kids often how much I love them and that my mental struggles are a result of an abusive childhood. I try not to let them see when I'm having major breakdowns. Maybe, hopefully it has helped.
 
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