Undiagnosed New Here and DID Question?

ChalliEpyx

New Here
Hello, I've been reading threads here without creating an account to gain info here and there before this. Call me Challiel and I've just recently reached adulthood.

My question?
I've been showing symptoms of DID (Undiagnosed) but don't really fit the full criteria. I've been curious about it since it seemed to be more obvious, especially after the pandemic. I used to think that these voices i often talk to were just imaginary friends that will probably fade with time as i grew older but somehow it didn't. That got me worried at that time and thinking if it was normal for one to often talk to themselves, to often find themselves not fully knowing who they are at times, often find themselves more comfortable with various names that just didn't make sense.
I've been denying having any sort of mental health issue because of the environment i grew up in. And after briefly finding out about Partial DID in the ICD-11, i found it scary how accurate of an explanation it was to my situation. At this point, I've already normalised talking to the characters or well people in my head but it still scares me if something might happen. And because i don't have anyone reliable or anyone i can trust to discuss this with, I've kept it to myself for the longest time. It's hard to open up about something to people who might openly avoid me if i said something different from the normality of things . . .

Anyways, enough of me. I hope i can grow and learn with everyone here, even though it takes a bit more reading than usual ^
 
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Hello Challiel,

Thank you for reaching out and sharing your concerns with us. It takes a lot of courage to talk about something that has been bothering you for a long time. It's important to remember that you are not alone in this. There are many people who experience similar things and find it helpful to connect with others who can relate.

It's important to consider seeking professional help to get a proper diagnosis and treatment if necessary. It's common to feel worried or scared about discussing mental health issues with others, but talking to a professional can be a good first step. They can provide you with support and guidance on the best way forward.

In the meantime, you can find support and understanding through the peer-to-peer community on myptsd.com. There are different forums available where you can speak with others who may have similar experiences or concerns. You can also find valuable information about DID and other related topics.

Remember that it's okay to take things one step at a time. You don't have to rush into anything or put pressure on yourself to resolve everything at once. Take the time you need to care for yourself and seek the support you need.

We wish you all the best in your journey towards healing and recovery.
 
Welcome to the forum!
There’s a number of different dissociative disorders recognised by the DSM 5, including OSDD which is a “not quite this or that” type disorder (previously DDNOS). That may help you figure things out.

Definitely seek out professional support. Dissociative disorders make functioning almost impossible at times, so if you have a disorder, get treatment so that life can get (substantially) easier for you:)
 
Aloha! @ChalliEpyx

Do you also suspect you may have PTSD?
I'm not too sure if i do honestly . . . since PTSD is trauma related and imo i don't exactly think what i've went through could be described as traumatic. Even so, i can't exactly recall anything much from my childhood either so i can't exactly say . . .
 
I'm not too sure if i do honestly . . . since PTSD is trauma related and imo i don't exactly think what i've went through could be described as traumatic. Even so, i can't exactly recall anything much from my childhood either so i can't exactly say . . .

As we’re a site whose sole focus is Trauma & PTSD, other disorders only in relation to being comorbid with PTSD? You might find better traction on site like NAMI Home | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness , whose focus includes the entirety of mental health.
 
hello challi. welcome to the forum.

does organizing the puppets in my head into casts and crews count as a DID symptom? it doesn't thin the intrusive thoughts much, but every so often it actually works when i meditatively visualize myself wading into the subliminal chaos and yell, "QUIET ON THE SET! ! !" the "puppets" are an allegory for the inner critics, etc., which my shrinks call intrusive thoughts and/or ruminating.

attempted humor aside. . .

DID is new on my personal radar and not on my psychiatric dx smorgasbord, but i take care when i start consulting doctor google. i buy the folk adage that a doctor who treats his/herself has a fool for a doctor. second, third and fourth opinions advised. i started therapy in 1972, so i am braced for new names for ^it^, as well. make friends with change. it's the only thing you can count on, especially with infant sciences such as psychology and computer science.

whatever the labels i ultimately go with, peer support helps me put all that pro gobbledygook into terms i can apply to my daily life. hope it helps you, too.
welcome aboard.
 
'm not too sure if i do honestly . . . since PTSD is trauma related and imo i don't exactly think what i've went through could be described as traumatic. Even so, i can't exactly recall anything much from my childhood either so i can't exactly say . . .
I've been diagnosed with both PTSD and DID, and I never believed (still don't) that my experiences when I was younger were "traumatic"--I also have virtually no memory of long periods of my childhood, which may or may not mean anything for you.

It is critical that you talk with a professional who has worked with both dissociative disorders and trauma in order to get a better handle on what exactly is going on (if anything). I spent a very long time trying to figure it out on my own, and that only did me harm. You should know that not everybody recognizes or treats DID the same way--so more than one evaluation is a good thing.

If you do end up with a DID diagnosis, I recommend visiting a peer-support site *specific* to that diagnosis. Other organizations are ok for resources--and using lots of resources to adjunct therapy is a great idea--but unless a person has the direct experience of DID, they have very limited understanding of how it manifests to the person who lives every day with it. That includes MDs and psychologists. I have a therapist now who has absolutely no clue about DID--and admits it--and the therapists I've seen in the past could only relate in terms of what they'd read and what other patients had told them. I learned most of what I did--what was normal, what was not, how to communicate, etc.--from peers.

There is some discussion on this forum under "Other Disorders" about DID, but not a whole lot.
 
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