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Research What makes a good trauma service?

#26
@RK176
The other thing that my therapist does well without making therapy about her, is sharing a little about her crazy family stories and relating things as normal bc so many things feel not normal. And she quickly makes me feel at ease when something more crazy comes up and lets me know that based on what happened my feelings and responses are totally normal for what happened. She doesn't have the same trauma history, but she acknowledges we all have trauma. Its part of life. I don't know if your history has trauma involved, but I don't think its bad to let your patients know that we all struggle with things and it is perfectly normal. Asking for help isn't a bad thing. The shame I carried for years and didn't ask for help made it a much longer journey than it probably needed to be.
 
#28
sharing a little about her crazy family stories
Omg so much this. I need to know my therapist is a human being besides a therapist. I have a very hard time putting together a therapeutic alliance with someone who is "just" a therapist.

My current therapist and I swap stories about our kids a lot. In the past I had a lot of trouble feeling like an adequate parent, and hearing what she's going through (our kids are roughly the same age) is a huge help to me.
 
#29
Omg so much this. I need to know my therapist is a human being besides a therapist. I have a very hard time putting together a therapeutic alliance with someone who is "just" a therapist.

My current therapist and I swap stories about our kids a lot. In the past I had a lot of trouble feeling like an adequate parent, and hearing what she's going through (our kids are roughly the same age) is a huge help to me.
yes, human being is the best way to phrase it for sure. Not superhuman and not just there bc its her job. I have the need to check in a lot about what its like to hear what I am saying to make sure its not damaging her either. Lol... In the beginning, I think she thought it wasn't needed but now there is an understanding that perhaps checking in for me was a sense of having some control in the midst of chaos. Also, I am always sure that people will find out who/what I really am and leave. That is the shame part that I work on daily. I feel like I know what it is like to carry this my whole life and I don't want that to be someone else's burden. But yes, it makes me feel more human when she can share something that helps me see that people have struggles and its ok to ask for help and we heal.
 
Thread starter #30
@RK176
The other thing that my therapist does well without making therapy about her, is sharing a little about her crazy family stories and relating things as normal bc so many things feel not normal. And she quickly makes me feel at ease when something more crazy comes up and lets me know that based on what happened my feelings and responses are totally normal for what happened. She doesn't have the same trauma history, but she acknowledges we all have trauma. Its part of life. I don't know if your history has trauma involved, but I don't think its bad to let your patients know that we all struggle with things and it is perfectly normal. Asking for help isn't a bad thing. The shame I carried for years and didn't ask for help made it a much longer journey than it probably needed to be.
I have always been a little reluctant to share my personal life as I fear it will take away from the clients experience but I shall certainly bear in mind what you have said. I do have history of trauma and I am not neurotypical either which I feel works to my advantage as the way I process information is slightly different to the 'norm' so it helps me see and understand things that others perhaps do not.
 
#33
During my masters, I realised this was something I found most challenging so its a working progress!
I think that if it's not something you feel comfortable doing, you just shouldn't do it. It's OK to know your weaknesses and play to your strengths. Not everyone is going to need a therapist who self-discloses a lot. It's my preference, but I've worked with therapists who never self-disclosed and still got something out of my work with them.
 
Thread starter #34
I think that if it's not something you feel comfortable doing, you just shouldn't do it. It's OK to know your weaknesses and play to your strengths. Not everyone is going to need a therapist who self-discloses a lot. It's my preference, but I've worked with therapists who never self-disclosed and still got something out of my work with them.
It's just nice to hear everyone's different opinions and experiences :)
 

Pepper360

Policy Enforcement
#35
I totally agree that the 50-minute sessions are just too short. Way too short. I'd like a week-long intensive bootcamp for trauma instead of 50 minutes once every week or two. Get on top of the problem quickly so I can get my life back.
 
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