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A thread for scientific nerdiness

Question for the science people - is it possible that the toenails on my left foot grow quicker than the toenails on my right foot? I assumed they all grew at roughly the same speed.

I've tried telling my brain this is an interesting question, but not one I need to get hung up on. But I finally got to soak in the tub and my distinctly uneven toenails just sat there smirking at me the whole time.

I seem to recall that our nails are made up of gross stuff. Which is bad enough. But this left v's right thing is messing with my brain. And I don't trust Google atm - it seems to be more interested in trying to sell me fungal treatments when I ask it about my toenails...???
 
Thread starter #208
Question for the science people - is it possible that the toenails on my left foot grow quicker than the toenails on my right foot?
Yep.
Could be something as simple as your right foot being slightly bigger than your left foot, so that when you wear shoes there's greater pressure on your right toenails that prevents them from growing as fast as your left.
I seem to recall that our nails are made up of gross stuff.
Hmm. They are largely made up of keratin. Which is just a type of protein, and is also found in our hair (as well as in hooves/horns/claws of other animals).
 
What @bellbird said... they can grow faster, something can be making it appear one side is growing faster/slower, and then my one add is that you may just be trimming your nails differently... which is common unless you’re ambidextrous, and cutting each nail at the exact same angle/position as you cut its sister-nail, instead of twisted like a pretzel for one side and straight shot for the other. >>> Aaaaaaand one last possibility I know rather too well>>>if you’re like me? :bag: You can just sort of <cough> Zone out and forget you weren’t done, when you walk off to go do something else. And then only later realize, YIKES! The f*ck happened here? This ain’t right. :cautious: :shifty:

Nope!!! Not gross! Pure protein. :D

One way to tell that you’re doing well on a vegan diet is to keep an eye on your hair and nails. Strong nails and lusterous hair speaks to the quality of protein in your diet. Complete proteins (legume+grain, quinoa, or nuts) are needed for all bodily functions... but hair & nails are the canary in the coal mine... the first to start getting thin and brittle. Next your immune system just gets kind of iffy. Still functional, but even minor things take a long time to heal, and every passing cold seems to at least stop over for a cuppa, even if it doesn’t stick around.

The gross part about nails is what’s under them, if you don’t scrub them frequently... that’s why the eeeeeew gets attached to nail biting. The only people I know who are thrilled about nail scrapings? Are criminologists. (What does it say about me that my grandmother despaired of my ever keeping my nails clean, but the moment I learned I could DNA-zap! my killer/rapist with fingernail scrapings? That these puppies are pristine at nearly all times? :whistling: More bizarre, it is freaking DIFFICULT in this country to find a decent nail brush >.< I finally started ordering them from Germany, as the single use disposable ones that can be found here, not only aren’t designed for multiple uses but the thin nylon bristles suck a giant flaming pile o’papercuts or are like baby’s eyelashes. The f*ck am I supposed to do with these? Yelp or blow kisses? How about scrub my durn nails? Hello? Do we have a brush for that? Yeesh.)
 
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when you wear shoes
Booyah! There it is!

It's finally winter here, so I've started wearing shoes when I walk doggo (grass is wet, shoes become necessary). And my right foot is definitely a different size to my left foot.

Definitely I can put that one to bed now. I'm a little uncomfortable about being lopsided, but you're right @Friday - getting through all 10 toes without losing patience/concentration is a big ask!
 
Question for the science people - is it possible that the toenails on my left foot grow quicker than the toenails on my right foot? I assumed they all grew at roughly the same speed.

I've tried telling my brain this is an interesting question, but not one I need to get hung up on. But I finally got to soak in the tub and my distinctly uneven toenails just sat there smirking at me the whole time.

I seem to recall that our nails are made up of gross stuff. Which is bad enough. But this left v's right thing is messing with my brain. And I don't trust Google atm - it seems to be more interested in trying to sell me fungal treatments when I ask it about my toenails...???
@Sideways My hair grows more hair on the left side of my head than on the right. One boob droops lower than the other. My foot on the left side is 1/2 size smaller than the one on the right. I'm past menopause....so I have less hair all over my body than when I was younger.....and more gray hair coming in. The body is always changing. I'd conclude that there is a strong possibility that your nails don't grow at the same speed either. Just because we are symmetrical, doesn't mean that everything is the same on both sides. ;)
 
Yep.
Could be something as simple as your right foot being slightly bigger than your left foot, so that when you wear shoes there's greater pressure on your right toenails that prevents them from growing as fast as your left.

Hmm. They are largely made up of keratin. Which is just a type of protein, and is also found in our hair (as well as in hooves/horns/claws of other animals).
You know, jello is made out of keratin......and so we are eating animal hooves in our desert.
 
Thread starter #213
jello is made out of keratin
Gelatin is derived from animal skins, cartilage and bones, but it is made from collagen, not keratin.

Both are proteins, but each has a different function, and therefore structure.
Keratin is very fibrous and less prone to tearing, which is why it's commonly found in body parts that are often in contact with other surfaces (nails, hooves, claws, etc.)

Collagen, on the other hand, is a major component of connective tissues (and is why as we age, our skin sags; we produce less collagen as we age). When you cook collagen, you get gelatin.
 
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