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Controlling symptoms when going through a lot of changes?

I need to make 3x what I usually do this and next month, I'm getting evicted so I need to minimize my stuff patch up apartment, sell some old stuff, have quick trip for a document and fins a new place and save first and deposit.

Meanwhile today a trigger hit and I had to make hot drink and take a pill and I'm still calming down.

Those days zap my energy and take a lot to recover from, how can I bounce back faster?



Do you guys have any recovery rourines for this situation?
 
That's a lot to deal with! I do try and get as much sleep as I can, even if I have to work extraordinary hours. I can typically go into beast-mode for up to three weeks knowing that I will take self-care time to address things afterward. Sometimes I have to cross things off my list or not do the same high level of work that I typically expect from myself. I use tons of exactly my favorite loud music played as often and repetitively as possible.

Do you have anyone to talk to? One day the triggers + new stress were just ridiculous and I had to show up and work one-on-one on an interior painting project. I didn't want to talk about anything, but I literally couldn't stop crying, so I tried to hide my face from my coworker. Eventually he had had enough and asked what was going on. I told him the smallest bit and his compassion was really positively overwhelming.

Is there anyone who can help you with the tasks so that you don't have the combined heavy load of all of the work plus the emotions/reactions you are working through?

Years ago when I was having tons of triggers and dissociation/misdirected anger/emotional overwhelm, my counselor had me keep a rating log of the triggers/reactions with a scale. It was super-brief, but the idea was to log it and move on, choosing later when I was not triggered if I wanted to explore anything in depth. Sometimes the thought of writing it down makes me so tired that I have this mental experience of it drifting away 🫠. It's like gallows-humor, like "oh no, I ain't got time for writing that down!" and then my brain is like, well maybe you don't have time to go through it either. I think it's like a fragmented-parts semi-functional association of self-protection. I envision it like on of those puzzle games where all the tiles interlock inside a square box that can't be opened, there's one empty space, and you slide everything around until it makes a cohesive picture.
 
I need to make 3x what I usually do this and next month, I'm getting evicted so I need to minimize my stuff patch up apartment, sell some old stuff, have quick trip for a document and fins a new place and save first and deposit.

Meanwhile today a trigger hit and I had to make hot drink and take a pill and I'm still calming down.

Those days zap my energy and take a lot to recover from, how can I bounce back faster?



Do you guys have any recovery rourines for this situation?
Sorry to hear you are having a hard time :/. I find that I bounce back easier if I do some extra self-care when I am feeling down.
 
Card carrying member of control freaks… united is the wrong word… determined? Maybe.

You CANNOT control all symptoms, all ways, whilst going though change.

So? Choose wisely, what you assert control over.

As some, simply doesn’t submit to control. And knowing when/how/where to bob & weave? To be reactive, and flexible, and adaptive? Is FUNDAMENTALLY more vital. Choose what you insist on being controlled VERY carefully. And? Trust yourself in managing chaos, for the rest. IME/IMO.
 
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