Sufferer Medical PTSD - New Diagnosis

I was recently diagnosed with medical trauma PTSD and I am struggling!

Last June, I was diagnosed with a seizure disorder at 47 years old. After a series of seizures and falls, I was in and out of the hospital all summer. On October 26th, my hubby found me unresponsive and called 911. They transported me to the closest ER.

By the time he got there I was intubated and they were transferring me to another hospital with a better ICU. I had uncontrollable seizure activity, brain swelling, meningitis, and a toxic level of lithium in my system ( I was on lithium for 7 years for bipolar disorder). They put me in a medically induced coma for 18 days and gave me a 50% chance of pulling thru.

I ended up pulling out of the coma and started a month and a half of inpatient rehab where I had to learn to walk again and gain strength to sit in a chair and learn how to swallow without choking. I was released on 12/30 ( so I spent the holidays in the hospital) and started 12 weeks of in- home therapy. I am permanently disabled and can no longer drive. My daughter is my in home caregiver and I feel like I have lost my identity.

I have struggled with anxiety, depression and bipolar disorder for most of my adult life so I am not new to therapy or medication, but the m/ptsd diagnosis has thrown me for a loop. I can’t control my emotions. I can’t sleep. As I am getting closer to the anniversary of when this happened, my depression is getting darker.

Long story short, I am looking for tools that have helped others with similar issues. I am working with a therapist and a psychiatrist but want to explore all options available. I have limited mobility but I can get out in short bursts. Thank you for any help you can provide. I am sick of this scared, stuck, dark place that I have been in since last year - I should be thankful to be here!

Thanks again!
 
I'm so sorry to hear about everything you've been through. It's completely understandable that you're struggling with the aftermath of such a traumatic experience. But know that you're not alone, and there are resources and support available to help you on your healing journey.

First and foremost, it's fantastic that you're already working with a therapist and psychiatrist. They will play a crucial role in your recovery, so continue to engage with them and openly express your struggles and concerns. In addition to professional help, connecting with others who have gone through similar experiences can be incredibly helpful.

On myptsd.com, you'll find specific forums dedicated to various topics related to PTSD and CPTSD. Whether you're looking for advice on managing emotions, strategies for coping with symptoms, or resources for self-care, there's a wealth of information and support available to you.

Please remember to be gentle with yourself. Healing takes time, and it's normal to have ups and downs. Don't hesitate to reach out for help when you need it, and be patient with yourself as you navigate this difficult journey.

You mentioned that you have limited mobility but can get out in short bursts. If you're comfortable, these short bursts can be a great opportunity to connect with nature, engage in gentle exercise like walking or stretching, and practice mindfulness. Even small moments outdoors can have a significant impact on your overall well-being.

Remember, you're not alone, and there is hope for healing and finding a sense of peace and joy again. Reach out to myptsd.com and let the community there embrace you with understanding, empathy, and support.
 
Welcome to the forum.

You’ve been through a lot. Dealing with lack of sleep in particular is bloody awful. There are some medications that can help you get your sleep back on track and it may be worth talking to your doctor about that.
Thank you for the advice. I do take Seroquel for sleep but may need to adjust the dosage as it doesn’t seem to be working as well as it should. I have also noticed that when I do sleep, I wake up extremely anxious and emotional. I have crying jags for the fist few minutes I wake and I am hyper vigilant. Mornings are really tough. I can’t seem to quiet my mind. I have not talked to my therapist about this yet.

Thanks again for your kind reply.
 
Welcome to the community!

I have struggled with anxiety, depression and bipolar disorder for most of my adult life s
As there are so many crossover symptoms between these disorders & PTSD? Expect a STEEP learning curve, in differentiating which is which, and what works when.

I have ADHD & PTSD, and whilst I can USUALLY identify which symptom is from which, and where? Sometimes I just have to throw best practice for EACH at a wall, and see what sticks. Sometimes one. Sometimes the other. Sometimes both.
 
Welcome to the community!


As there are so many crossover symptoms between these disorders & PTSD? Expect a STEEP learning curve, in differentiating which is which, and what works when.

I have ADHD & PTSD, and whilst I can USUALLY identify which symptom is from which, and where? Sometimes I just have to throw best practice for EACH at a wall, and see what sticks. Sometimes one. Sometimes the other. Sometimes both.
Thank you for the reply. I am noticing the similarities and the difficulty in differentiating between all the different disorders. Throw a traumatic brain injury on top of it and it makes for a chaotic mess. I am hoping my therapist can help me navigate between them all ( as well as support from here).
 
Welcome to the forum.

I suggest working on the sleep issue and making this a priority as everything else is so much worse when you can’t/don’t sleep. Getting ahold of this issue will likely make your other symptoms better. Then you can move forward and tackle the other symptoms as well. In my experience, it can be crucial to get on the right mix of meds when you are very symptomatic. This can help with simply allowing your body to calm down. I was on a heavier mix of meds when I was at my worst, but now I’m on fewer, as I need less symptom control.
 
Welcome to the forum.

I suggest working on the sleep issue and making this a priority as everything else is so much worse when you can’t/don’t sleep. Getting ahold of this issue will likely make your other symptoms better. Then you can move forward and tackle the other symptoms as well. In my experience, it can be crucial to get on the right mix of meds when you are very symptomatic. This can help with simply allowing your body to calm down. I was on a heavier mix of meds when I was at my worst, but now I’m on fewer, as I need less symptom control.
Thank you - luckily I have an appointment with my psychiatrist on Monday morning so I can discuss this new diagnosis and the sleep issues. I am hoping to find some relief!
 
I'm glad you found us. It's a process dealing with PTSD, but you can have a life you want again, that doesn't feel so dark emotionally.

Remember that emotions don't always reflect reality. That one has helped me through some dark times.

Welcome 🫂❤️
 
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