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Other My Reading Disability - Cursive Writing vs Printed Text

This is very interesting. I write in a mix of cursive and print, mostly cursive. And it is like a short hand for myself. Reading print or type is very difficult for me but I thought it was just me. I have learned how to read (skim) printed work and get the concepts I need. I read very slowly if I have to read every word. I had no idea it could be addressed. But I am hearing impaired as well so listening is even harder than reading print...so I just managed.

I also need to read out loud if I do not understand what I am reading. Its like my eyes and ears need to experience it simultaneously to comprehend what the text is saying.
 
Brains are odd things. I used to be incapable of reading out loud because my brain was reading through the sentence faster than my mouth could get around the words. Any attempt to slow my brain down and I’d get in a right old pickle.

Since I had a TBI I can’t read as well or fast at all. Scrambles my brain. Can read out loud just grand now.
 
Since I had a TBI I can’t read as well or fast at all. Scrambles my brain. Can read out loud just grand now.
I did voices/accents to read out loud… worked so great with kids books the bookstore I took my kid to thought I was the “story lady” …but it’s a little “no, just no” when in a study group memorizing types of arrhythmias. If ONLY I’d thought to add a dance, to it!!! (Usually I only respond with interpretive dance, instead of words, when I’m annoyed with people.)

 
mini-me still believes she is as hopelessly broken as any "retard," but since bigger me slipped that first diagnosis, i have come to think of the ways those letters keep flipping as a super power.
This life-long reading disability does make one believe they are 'hopelessly broken' ...it's a day after day difficulty that never goes away. Some have say to me that, this difficulty shouldn't bother me once I'm beyond high school yet, they are so wrong. Everyday presents a challenge of some type. But then, this malfunction of 'flipping' images and letters is a super power! Flipping or inverting visual images is a mental task I often perform when drawing.
being able to see mirror images made me a top shelf circuit designer, among other things.
Exactly as I see it, as well - structures have no up-side unless we assign an up-side to them. Whether designing shelf circuits or drawing human or animal forms their structure remains unchanged, regardless of our viewing angle. I take advantage of flipping or inverting images when I'm drawing, often using a physical mirror. This helps me check for errors.
i still haven't joined any of the sides on the diagnostic debate. start the debate without me, my accredited ones. i surely don't like the way you treat your unaccredited lab rats. pardon me while i go hang with the other lab rats. pass the cheese, minnie mouse.
Sometimes there just isn't enough data to form a valid debate. So yeah, please pass the cheese, popcorn ...and enjoy the remaining show.
 
Brains are odd things. I used to be incapable of reading out loud because my brain was reading through the sentence faster than my mouth could get around the words. Any attempt to slow my brain down and I’d get in a right old pickle.
I doubt that the brain’s processing of words could ever willfully be slowed down to synchronize with the person’s mouth and tongue movements when speaking. Was this lack of a synchronization caused by your TBI. I think, I acquired developmental brain damage early in my life. I was told I was born with abnormalities in my cerebellum.


Since I had a TBI I can’t read as well or fast at all. Scrambles my brain. Can read out loud just grand now.

When I speak or read silently to myself, I will often synchronize my subtle tongue movements with the words I am reading. If this motor activity plays an important role in my comprehension of words, I might assume that, my reading speed would never exceed the speed of my tongue movements, as if, I were speaking in sign-language.
 
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