Sufferer New here. Just diagnosed with PTSD but no DR will back it up.

joeylittle

Administrator
My next appt with my primary care is Tuesday, my husband is going with me to be an advocate. He feels like they aren't taking me seriously, which they aren't. I am hoping it helps with getting help.
I'm really glad to read this - having an advocate is a helpful thing.

Before the visit, you and your husband should try and sit down and talk through the timeline of your current symptoms; when things started getting very bad. You may find that there's more of a straight line towards being diagnosed for major depressive disorder, which can be a way to accelerate getting short-term disability leave, especially if you are currently employed and have access to FMLA. The rapid weight loss you are describing is a significant symptom, as is being unable to sleep through the night, and the weepiness as well.

When you're talking through symptoms with your husband, try and stay focused on the 'what', more than 'why'. I think sometimes we end up believing that it's more important to emphasize why we think we feel the way we do, when in fact - the information that will let the doctor get to the 'why' is totally contained by the facts of what is happening. Oh, I have no idea if I'm making this followable...But from a clinical reporting perspective: one example would be, the fact that you recognize your stress response as mirroring how you felt during the abuse? That's not actually important right now. What's important is that you are having uncontrollable reactions to stress, which include shaking, crying, being easily startled, etc.

I'm not saying that you should avoid talking about the abuse. Just that the symptoms - the physical and emotional things you experience - those are essential. And it's easy to end up glossing over them, especially when we have only just made the connection that they all connect to trauma. ALSO - it sounds like you're experiencing delayed-onset PTSD, which can add an extra layer of complication. It's a real thing, legitimate diagnosis - but I'm not sure all general practice doctors are aware of that.

You might try searching around the forum for other threads on talking to doctors and describing symptoms. Also, please feel free to start a new thread in a sub-forum (just use general if you're not sure where to go), to ask more questions about communicating and managing symptoms while seeking more formal medical support.
 

LisaZ

New Here
I'm really glad to read this - having an advocate is a helpful thing.

Before the visit, you and your husband should try and sit down and talk through the timeline of your current symptoms; when things started getting very bad. You may find that there's more of a straight line towards being diagnosed for major depressive disorder, which can be a way to accelerate getting short-term disability leave, especially if you are currently employed and have access to FMLA. The rapid weight loss you are describing is a significant symptom, as is being unable to sleep through the night, and the weepiness as well.

When you're talking through symptoms with your husband, try and stay focused on the 'what', more than 'why'. I think sometimes we end up believing that it's more important to emphasize why we think we feel the way we do, when in fact - the information that will let the doctor get to the 'why' is totally contained by the facts of what is happening. Oh, I have no idea if I'm making this followable...But from a clinical reporting perspective: one example would be, the fact that you recognize your stress response as mirroring how you felt during the abuse? That's not actually important right now. What's important is that you are having uncontrollable reactions to stress, which include shaking, crying, being easily startled, etc.

I'm not saying that you should avoid talking about the abuse. Just that the symptoms - the physical and emotional things you experience - those are essential. And it's easy to end up glossing over them, especially when we have only just made the connection that they all connect to trauma. ALSO - it sounds like you're experiencing delayed-onset PTSD, which can add an extra layer of complication. It's a real thing, legitimate diagnosis - but I'm not sure all general practice doctors are aware of that.

You might try searching around the forum for other threads on talking to doctors and describing symptoms. Also, please feel free to start a new thread in a sub-forum (just use general if you're not sure where to go), to ask more questions about communicating and managing symptoms while seeking more formal medical support.
Thank you so much for all your advice. it really helps!!!
Lisa
 

whiteraven

MyPTSD Pro
In my area, we have several clinics that employ psychiatrists that offer sliding scale or very low fees. If you haven't already, you might want to check around for those.

I also think it might be a good idea to check with online sites. You said you had exhausted online searches, but it wasn't clear if that was for psychiatrists or for help with symptoms.

Wondering if your therapist has helped you with any tools to manage your daily symptoms? When you say they don't get it, do you mean they aren't hearing you. or their suggestions aren't helpful? Maybe breaking your symptoms down would help--like, one week you could say you are not sleeping, and see what sort of help you can get with that...
 

Roland

Confident
In my area, we have several clinics that employ psychiatrists that offer sliding scale or very low fees. If you haven't already, you might want to check around for those.

I also think it might be a good idea to check with online sites. You said you had exhausted online searches, but it wasn't clear if that was for psychiatrists or for help with symptoms.

Wondering if your therapist has helped you with any tools to manage your daily symptoms? When you say they don't get it, do you mean they aren't hearing you. or their suggestions aren't helpful? Maybe breaking your symptoms down would help--like, one week you could say you are not sleeping, and see what sort of help you can get with that...
If you live in the United States, you can call 211 on the phone and they connect you with mental health resources, also NAMI (National Alliance of Mental Illness). But obviously, idk where you live
 
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