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Working from Home--or Not

whiteraven

MyPTSD Pro
So this is another of those things that fits in more than one place, but work is the predominant theme, so here I am.

I currently am a contractor providing services to a very large, global company. It's probably the best job I've ever had because they treat employees--both full-time and contractors--very well. I've never had a company that *cared* about me as a person or that made my life/work balance a priority.

I worked onsite for maybe 6 months, then I got permission to work full-time from home. Besides the fact that I wasn't sitting with my team (and in fact, was sitting in a huge room alone) and I had nothing to do I couldn't do at home, I would always leave with an immense amount of pain. The place is massive--the restroom was the equivalent of a 4 or 5 block walk, and the parking lot was like walking to the next state.

The last few days we've had an event at work that I attended (I agreed to go in occasionally for special events) and now I'm hurting--badly. One of the things mentioned during the week was that the work-from-home policy was changing, and that they are going to be much stricter when approving requests.

There are lots of emotional reasons I don't want to work onsite, but the physical pain is an issue, and it's what I used as a reason when I first applied. Now I'm going to have to reapply, and I'm not sure how to explain the effect of walking and sitting for long periods on my body. I have fibro and costochondritis (which results in a LOT of ribcage pain when I lift or walk), but I don't think it'll be enough to just say that.

Any ideas? I think part of me is feeling guilty for having pain and needing accommodations.
 
my strongest idea is to ply therapy tools to the guilt factor. it's okay to have needs. welcome to life.

i did my own work-at-home gigs in the 80's and 90's when it was far from accepted practice. the suspicion of the practice was almost as great of the envy from people who wanted to pull it off themselves. when stirrings arouse to force me back onsite, i took a two-prong approach.

1) i made sure i was the top producer in my department. if needed, i would put in extra hours to be sure it was so.
2) i started giving little surprise gifts and thank you cards to the people who made the final decisions.
 
1) i made sure i was the top producer in my department. if needed, i would put in extra hours to be sure it was so.
My performance is excellent--I actually was formally recognized and got a bonus twice this year for it. I'm not concerned about that. I'm just worried that the medical reason (pain) won't be enough for them to approve my request.
 
My performance is excellent--I actually was formally recognized and got a bonus twice this year for it. I'm not concerned about that. I'm just worried that the medical reason (pain) won't be enough for them to approve my request.
i seldom mentioned the aches and pains which motivated me to work at home. no secret. just efficiency and respect for the fact that. officially, my personal blues aren't highly relevant to finishing a project. when defending my choice of office location, the defense was doing the best work i am capable of. my highly customized office is a key factor in what you formally recognized me for, my friend.
 
i seldom mentioned the aches and pains which motivated me to work at home
I get that.

when defending my choice of office location, the defense was doing the best work i am capable of. my highly customized office is a key factor in what you formally recognized me for, my friend.
I will be required to defend my need/desire to work from home, though. It doesn't matter how good my work is. And I am hearing pretty much the only thing they might approve is a medical excuse.
 
Well, we can hope!
It’s clearly documented that you do good work for them, and do it well.

Bring in your medical documentation, and your awards, and save the stress for IF you need to appeal the decision. Which seems unlikely.

I know. Easier said, than done.

But?
My performance is excellent--I actually was formally recognized and got a bonus twice this year for it.
Your performance is documented. (Bring that in, with you.)
Your medical issues are documented. (Bring that in, with you.)

And? Ask for a decision early, if it’s a waiting-waiting-waiting aretheygoingtoohmygodwhatifthey stress loop in your head.

The casual, just wanted to be proactive and get in front of the new policy,
✨ BLING ✨ good employee thing.
 
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