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Art Thread

A random doodle:
 

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Doodle improved
So very expressive! I'm assuming this was drawn from your imagination. I like the added color drawing as well.

This drawing technique is somewhat similar to the ‘weighted modeling’ technique, described by Kimon Nicolaides, in his book titled, The Natural Way to Draw (an old wordy book that’s different from most modern books on drawing)

Nicolaides doesn’t provide instructions on the accurate copying of an object but rather this 'weighted' drawing method has more to do with recording the artist’s imagined sensations of experiencing the 3-dimensions of length, width and depth, even when visualized within their mind.

It’s almost as if the artist were touching and exploring the surface of the imagined object with their crayon, pencil or finger, while their movements were being recorded onto the paper. Though these drawings are likely distorted, the results can be quite interesting, unique and self-expressive.
 
@spinningmytires, thank you for your insights!

I like the notion of 'recording' what is seen. That is what I find myself doing; I often draw in my mind, from faces, nature etc.
And I don't mind said distortions, actually I cherish them, like how the ear is misplaced etc.

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Here's one after a photo, then adding my own touch in coloring/shadows:
 

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@spinningmytires, thank you for your insights!

I like the notion of 'recording' what is seen. That is what I find myself doing; I often draw in my mind, from faces, nature etc.
And I don't mind said distortions, actually I cherish them, like how the ear is misplaced etc.

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Here's one after a photo, then adding my own touch in coloring/shadows:
When we draw from observation or even a photograph, I’d say, we grasp a far better understanding of what’s in front of us. Distortions are cool where not accepting them will frustrate the artist to peices!!

Normally there’s a tendency to focus on the key elements of importance while ignoring the remaining as redundant - such is the case in every day life. Seeing the entire picture generally requires way too much conscious effort. Then too, I tend to abstract what I don’t understand, perhaps, in the same way that a child might abstract a stick figure.

I have occasionally drawn imaginary faces and will sometimes form an impression about what I think they might be feelings. However, this isn’t often the case. Some will have a pleasant subtle smile while others seem calm, relaxed yet possibly disengaged. I wonder if, I dissociate while drawing from my imagination. I know I will lose track of time.
 
Thanks but I think this didn't work. This link is a '404 unfound page.'
Oh I didn't link to it, just explaining that I used a reference photo. A simple Google image search on 'face'. Or did you mean my drawing? That should work.

Yeah, generally I don't understand what I'm drawing. It just comes out. When more abstract I can sometimes find a title for it, or assign some meaning to it, but generally I like the idea that I'm not intentionally creating art. I just have a hard time not doing it.

Drawing can be thought of as dissociation. Or more precise, sublimation. An adaptive defense mechanism, according to Freud.
It can also be an incredibly helpful therapeutic tool.
 
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Oh I didn't link to it, just explaining that I used a reference photo. A simple Google image search on 'face'. Or did you mean my drawing? That should work.

Yeah, generally I don't understand what I'm drawing. It just comes out. When more abstract I can sometimes find a title for it, or assign some meaning to it, but generally I like the idea that I'm not intentionally creating art. I just have a hard time not doing it.

Drawing can be thought of as dissociation. Or more precise, sublimation. An adaptive defense mechanism, according to Freud.
It can also be an incredibly helpful therapeutic tool.

So when you say that you ‘generally don’t understand what you are drawing …that it just comes out’ - I would suspect that, we draw with various degrees of conscious awareness. This is how I’ve experienced my own drawing.

The idea is that, too much control simply shuts down the creative drawing process. At the opposite end, are the technical methods described in Betty Edwards book, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.

She addresses how our pre-conceived notions, memories and filtering misguide our drawing. Yet, her main focus is on creating more accurate copy work. Her ‘upside-down drawing’ method certainly breaks the emotional connection between the artist and their drawing. This method can be used effectively with copy work but not when drawing from one’s imagination - this has been my experience. I might not even know what it is that, I'm drawing though, eventually it will begin to take shape.

I did explore non-objective abstract painting during my 20s, only to be frustrated by it - perhaps because my paintings always seemed to feel unfinished to me.

I feel mostly attracted to solid, heavy structural forms that are connected to the earth rather than to a more airy, weightless atmosphere of intangible colored light. Perhaps, this is way I tend to ignore light, color and shadow when I draw. Neither light, color nor shadow are anything I can touch nor feel with my hand, and so, I’ll simply view them as being irrelevant.

Many times, I have viewed an abstract painting or almost anything that consists of numerous vague amorphous marks and shapes, for perhaps 20 minutes or more - I entertain myself this way. I've also felt less lonely when doing it. I’d assume this might be one form of dissociation.
 
Lousy croquis that turned into Robocop or something
Your figure drawing is very similar to what Kimon Nicolaides described as ‘modelled drawing.’ Here the figure's surface area closest to the artist would be drawn with a lighter touch of the pen or crayon while the receding distant surfaces receive a much greater pressure which then making them darker.

In this case, light and shadow are basically being ignored, as something must be ignored momentarily when drawing. I've struggled to learn the basics of light logic (the pattern of light and shadow) while line drawing has come much easier for me.

I like that you’re worked across the inner surface of the form because that’s where the greatest information resides. Looks like you’ve been practicing your figure drawing for quite awhile. Foreshortening, just like perspective, are 2-dimensional concepts that very few people ever grasp. Figure drawing isn't easy either.

I sometimes have difficulty connecting the arms and hands to the shoulders. There’s an awkwardness there, as if, I’m not consciously aware of my own arms. When drawing the figure there's a projection that occurs, as if, I were drawing myself. And when the gesture isn't felt the drawing can become stiff and awkward - here the arms that I draw might seem, as if, merely dangling appendages.
 
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Thanks @spinningmytires, I appreciate your feedback.
It was done with a ballpen and then a marker for coloring.
I sometimes have difficulty connecting the arms and hands to the shoulders. There’s an awkwardness there, as if, I’m not consciously aware of my own arms. When drawing the figure there's a projection that occurs, as if, I were drawing myself. And when the gesture isn't felt the drawing can become stiff and awkward - here the arms that I draw might seem, as if, merely dangling appendages.
Relatable. I can clearly sense if drawing a body part feels awkward and disengaged, or natural, or connected to something natural. I heard a definition of art once, to express something natural.
 
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