1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

I believed for 1104 days her death was a suicide... now maybe not???

Discussion in 'Military & Emergency Services' started by brokenEMT, May 1, 2018.

  1. Friday

    Friday Raise Hell Moderator

    13,311
    44,017
    21,983
    Doesn’t have to. You have CritA in spades.

    ANYTHING can trigger pre-existing PTSD to go symptomatic. Any new trauma, stressor, stress, or loss of a coping mechanism.

    Your partner’s death triggered yours. It doesn’t matter how they died. The same way that if you quit smoking and it triggered yours it wouldn’t matter that it’s doing something healthy... it’s still a loss of a coping mechanism.

    - You have the trauma history that makes PTSD possible.
    - You have the constellation of symptoms that means it’s PTSD instead of something else.

    ***

    Overdoses are rarely characterized as suicides, here in the states. For a few reasons. The biggest of which being that it’s impossible to get into someone’s head and know if they were trying to kill themselves, or just looking for a moment of peace / to get high, so investigators look at the situation. Without a suicide note or clear indication of intent to die (like downing a whole bottle of pills) they’re generally ruled as accidental deaths. The second of which is that most insurance & pensions have suicide clauses. Meaning that they don’t pay out if you killed yourself. Your family gets nothing.

    I’m sure the airline tried to have the death ruled a suicide, so they wouldn’t be liable for any lawsuits from the family. (You can’t be held responsible for someone’s death if they tried to die). I’m sure that coming from Cuba their next suspicion was drug muling... which, in the states, also negates most insurance claims and lawsuits (dying whilst in the commission of a crime), and am equally certain that the airline dumped tons of money into trying to ascertain -or imply- that. Here in the US that type of exclusionary investigation takes at least 2 years, and a good team of lawyers can make it drag on for years and years... preventing the family from receiving any kind of settlement. Every year they keep the manner of death in legal limbo is interest they’re collecting on the millions in the bank, and if they can get the family to drop it, those millions as well.

    ^^^
    This entire section below the asterisks? Is just politics of money and death in the USA.

    NONE of it affects your diagnosis. Its just the games that multinational corporations (airlines, insurance companies) play to avoid losing money.

    ***

    Add in that we’re (American Citizens) still not allowed to travel to/from Cuba??? It’s highly illegal... Giant huge police problem having a whole aircraft FROM Cuba land here. Which means that it’s not a “simple” death being investigated by local police (and insurance and airlines) but also would have roped in the FAA/ DEA/ CIA / FBI / Homeland. Each dealing with their own individual parts & investigations & conflicts... in conjunction with CSIS & related sister agencies in Canada.

    To be completely honest, I’d be surprised if your friend’s case is completely closed... and not still “part of an ongoing investigation” in at least 2 countries. Possibly more, depending on the nationality of the other passengers, and any kind of cargo in the belly of the plane. These types of things, even when completely innocent, are legal nightmares.

    ^^^
    This entire section below the asterisks? Pure International Law & Politics...Again, has ZERO effect on your diagnosis.

    Your friend died. The stress of that kicked you into being symptomatic. It didn’t cause your PTSD. It kickstarted it. All the rest is just politics. f*ck that noise. It doesn’t matter. You matter. Your friend matters. Politics? Doesn’t.
     
  2. Register to participate in live chat, PTSD discussion and more.
  3. Freida

    Freida Been There, Done That, Lived to Tell the Story Premium Member

    4,223
    15,006
    4,783
    What she said ^^^^^^!!!!!
     
    blackemerald1 and littleoc like this.
  4. brokenEMT

    brokenEMT Well-Known Member

    906
    2,998
    643
    I've been wondering about this myself, and if it played a role. From what I was told there was no note, just the OD. Obviously suspicious OD, but that maybe doesn't mean it can be officially ruled a suicide, even if that's the most likely scenario. Just like my niece's death, there's knowing what happened, and then there's being able to prove it beyond a reasonable doubt.

    I hadn't even thought about that... I completely forgot about US/Cuba relations.
     
    blackemerald1, littleoc and Freida like this.
  5. brokenEMT

    brokenEMT Well-Known Member

    906
    2,998
    643
    I'm really tired, like I've never slept in my life kind of tired. And my brain hurts.
     
    DharmaGirl, littleoc and Zoogal like this.
  6. Freida

    Freida Been There, Done That, Lived to Tell the Story Premium Member

    4,223
    15,006
    4,783
    I'm sorry hun --- you've been through so much in such a short amount of time......:hug:
     
    blackemerald1, littleoc and Zoogal like this.
  7. Zoogal

    Zoogal I'm a VIP

    4,086
    7,839
    3,893
    Oh honey I know that feeling. I'm sorry.
     
    blackemerald1, littleoc and Freida like this.
  8. littleoc

    littleoc Making everywhere I go a better place Premium Member Donated

    2,791
    8,671
    4,033
    Sending many hugs.
     
  9. brat17

    brat17 I'm a VIP

    2,810
    5,099
    5,153
    Im sorry brokenEMT....sometimes we have to draw our own conclusions just to get some closure.
     
    blackemerald1 and littleoc like this.
  10. chipman

    chipman New Member

    10
    13
    3
    I assume that she lived in the same area as you. Get a police report about her death. If they can't or won't give you how she died then go to the medical examiner or the district attorney. Someone knows and even if it takes getting a lawyer you can find out. Your employer just wants the matter to go away. You will know one way or the other.
     
    Freida likes this.
  11. FragileGlass

    FragileGlass Active Member

    186
    520
    133
    Sadly, I’m joining this conversation late in the game. Two critical factors to always keep in mind.....One: WCB does not walk in our shoes, Two: We are breathing meat bags that fill space for profit to our employers.

    I am currently navigating the WCB insanity and my ASD and PTSD were outliers to the reason WCB became involved. I was injured pretty badly by a patient. Which triggered a whole bunch of other issues that had already been established but became a huge factor as to why I can’t return to work.

    Don’t discount yourself and your beliefs. Remember my reasons One and Two are why you are being discounted. I’m sorry you’re going through this but always listen to your gut insctincts and try to find the strength to fight it.

    Canada may seem like the best free health care provider in the world. I’m proud of Canada. I am not proud of how poorly it treats those of us in the medical field, Emergency Response or Hospitals.
     
    Daph, littleoc, Freida and 1 other person like this.
Loading...
Similar Threads -
Show Sidebar