Sufferer Saying hi - Recently diagnosed with PTSD and seeking help for childhood trauma

Hey there,

Recently I was diagnosed with PTSD and will be getting help for it. Though I suspect that I have cPTSD because I relate so very much to the symptoms and because of the severity of my childhood abuse and neglect. My psychologist told me that my work environment as it is, is triggering me and I definitely notice this. I never could've suspected it because it doesn't hold a candle to the things that traumatized me, but it's undeniable that I'm ''reverting'' in a way to an earlier version of myself. I now see how right she is. This situation caused me to finally, again, seek help because I'm very worried about my mental health. Earlier attempts at seeking help failed but I finally seem to have found someone and I'll be put on the waiting list for specialized help for those with childhood trauma. As I said, this led to me being diagnosed.

I'm currently almost 32 years old and I live in the Netherlands. Being diagnosed is a relief to me though I do know that therapy will uproot a LOT-- because I now have confirmation what's going on and I can now seperate more easily what's ''me'' and what are my symptoms. For example, I find that it's much easier to recognize what's what: I'm NOT a cursed, dark, evil person, me feeling that way is a symptom. I'm an acceptable person to whom really bad things happened. I want to work on recognizing triggers and get out of my freeze/fawn more easily.

Anyway, that's it for now I guess. As for my name, I'm not a cult leader of any kind :P I chose it because it reflects a core motivation of mine: a powerful jump towards the light, away from the core sickness and disfunction that I come from.

I hope to read and learn here.
 
Welcome to the myptsd.com community! We're glad you found us and that you're seeking help for your PTSD and suspected CPTSD. It's understandable that being diagnosed can bring a mix of relief and apprehension, as therapy can indeed stir up challenging emotions and memories. Remember that this process is an important step towards healing and reclaiming your life.

Recognizing the difference between your true self and the symptoms of your trauma is a significant breakthrough. It can help you develop a greater sense of self-compassion, knowing that the negative thoughts and feelings you experience are a result of what you've been through, rather than a reflection of your inherent worth. You're absolutely right – you are not a cursed, dark, or evil person. You are someone who has endured immense pain and deserves support and healing.

Working on identifying triggers and finding ways to cope with the freeze/fawn response can be a valuable part of your healing journey. Connecting with others who understand what you're going through can also provide a great source of support and validation. In this community, you'll find people who have walked a similar path and can share their experiences and insights.

While myptsd.com cannot replace professional help, it serves as a vital space for individuals to connect with others who are experiencing or supporting someone with PTSD and CPTSD. It's important to remember that seeking professional help is crucial in your healing process. Fortunately, you mentioned that you have found someone who specializes in childhood trauma and who can provide the specialized help you need. That's a significant step forward!

Feel free to explore the various forums available on myptsd.com. You will find specific sections dedicated to PTSD, CPTSD, and other topics related to trauma, therapy, and self-help. Engaging in these forums can offer insights, support, and a sense of community as you navigate your healing journey.

Once again, welcome to the community. We look forward to your participation and are here to support you along the way.

Take care,

Riley Jones
 
hello light and warmth. welcome to the forum. sorry for what brings you here but glad you are here.
I can now seperate more easily what's ''me'' and what are my symptoms. For example, I find that it's much easier to recognize what's what: I'm NOT a cursed, dark, evil person, me feeling that way is a symptom. I'm an acceptable person to whom really bad things happened.
that separation of self and illness has proven critical to my own recovery. half a century into my recovery, i am still frequently amazed at how helpful the skills acquired through my recovery help me in the more general aspects of life. sometimes i think i'm even learning how to pay it forward to help other people find a modicum of dignity on a rough day. when bad things happen to good people, a spot of kindness and compassion can help them remember they are an acceptable person to whom really bad things happened.

welcome aboard. hope healing happens here.
 
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