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What was the most interesting item(s) in your newsfeeds today?

#75
This fascinated and inspired me. Oh yes she did...

Blind Astronomer Found the Way to Hear the Stars by Sonification

"I thought long and hard about it when I suddenly realized that all a light curve is, is a table of numbers converted into a visual plot. So along with my collaborators, we worked really hard and we translated the numbers into sound. I achieved access to the data, and today I'm able to do physics at the level of the best astronomer, using sound. And what people have been able to do, mainly visually, for hundreds of years, now I do it using sound."
 
#78
Oops...I never did dive any deeper into the article up yonder ^^^. Out of sight out of mind.

Meanwhile, today I happened upon this free master gardener class from Oregon State University. Not sure if my attention span can hang with it all, but I'm gonna give it a shot.

I thought others might also be interested for themselves, or maybe to do with their kids. Having youth (and adults) learn how to grow edible things would rock so hard, especially now, when learning to grow our own could benefit and feed so many....

Master Gardener Series: Vegetable Gardening Online Course
 
#79
As someone who successfully eliminated animal products from my diet after having been raised on them and partaking in them daily, multiple times a day for over 4 decades, I find this article very necessary, relevant, and timely.

My overall physical and mental health improved greatly in doing so, eventually, as I was hurriedly catapulted into the change via an ER visit. I gave it all up overnight with the help of a friend who had previously been in similar shoes.

I since learned that we don't only digest the products, but also the energies of the processes. Way too many of those energies were shared by me as a repeated sexual and physical abuse survivor, and that hit my heart space hard - and still does.

I know I never thought twice about any of it until my body gave me a harsh ultimatum - change my consumption habits, or start losing organs. I had never been taught I could healthily exist without them.

One Root Cause of Pandemics Few People Think About

"...The conditions in which we often farm animals today—crowding tens of thousands of animals wing-to-wing or snout-to-snout—serve as "amplifiers" for viral pandemics.

...And at this very moment, both India and China have announced bird flu outbreaks among their chicken factories. Similarly, these are not yet affecting human health.


...If we have the will to shut down our entire society for weeks on end, surely we have the will to slightly change our diets."
 
#80
As someone who successfully eliminated animal products from my diet after having been raised on them and partaking in them daily, multiple times a day for over 4 decades, I find this article very necessary, relevant, and timely.

My overall physical and mental health improved greatly in doing so, eventually, as I was hurriedly catapulted into the change via an ER visit. I gave it all up overnight with the help of a friend who had previously been in similar shoes.

I since learned that we don't only digest the products, but also the energies of the processes. Way too many of those energies were shared by me as a repeated sexual and physical abuse survivor, and that hit my heart space hard - and still does.

I know I never thought twice about any of it until my body gave me a harsh ultimatum - change my consumption habits, or start losing organs. I had never been taught I could healthily exist without them.

One Root Cause of Pandemics Few People Think About

"...The conditions in which we often farm animals today—crowding tens of thousands of animals wing-to-wing or snout-to-snout—serve as "amplifiers" for viral pandemics.

...And at this very moment, both India and China have announced bird flu outbreaks among their chicken factories. Similarly, these are not yet affecting human health.

...If we have the will to shut down our entire society for weeks on end, surely we have the will to slightly change our diets."
I don't eat animals born on metal, raised on metal, and die on metal.....they are in confinements which are super unhealthy. I do eat farm raised animals whose diet consists of nuts, bugs, and who see the sky and the sun everyday all day. While for many people that choice is a luxury as it is more expensive. But people would not have enough meat if we didn't have confinements...a concept started by big business looking to buy up farm land.....and pack as many in as possible to feed as many as possible.......not to say growth hormones and daily antibiotics-which many now do not use as much of, and growth hormones have been restricted....so they say.
But until there are fewer mouths to feed.....I doubt much will be done about it. People have to eat.
 
#81
People do have to eat, for sure @TruthSeeker , but they don't HAVE to eat animal products, especially not as much or as often as they're typically consumed here in the US. We truly are what we eat, and what the animals we eat eats, and are injected with, and the experiences they endure. Everything we do is an energetic exchange. Every body is also very different, so I can't speak for anyone but myself and my direct experience. I was hardcore convinced I'd die without it, or at the least, be totally miserable and missing out on taste, but eventually learned just the opposite.

I had already shifted my habits into eating only the local "humanely" raised/killed meats, too, until I realized humane and slaughter don't fit together in my head or heart, no matter how I tried to twist it to make sense. The so called "happy cow" dairy industry, as well, is anything but humane. As well as the so called "cage-free" egg industry.

I realized fish marinate in their own toilet all day every day, as well as all the crap us humans pollute the waters with. Yum. Not. Marketing terminology and commercial advertisements make it easier for many to never look beyond grocery aisles, though. When many do choose to take a peek, they realize it's probably best to just not know. I tried to ignore it for a while, but decided to visit each arena personally. It was overwhelming in many regards. I learned if we can't handle seeing/doing the process, we likely shouldn't partake in the product, especially as a repeated trauma survivor. That made it hit home even harder for me.

They have pick your own berries/pumpkins/apples/etc., but I haven't seen any slit your own steak or burger's throat/behead and pluck your own chickens/come on over and "humanely" butcher your own pig for your bacon/or come forcibly impregnate your own cow then take it's calf away so you humans can have all its milk for your coffee, cereal, yogurt, and cheese, instead, and go ahead and slaughter the calf, too, if it's male, so you can have a side of veal/and don't forget to kill the little lambs along the way.

Blatant truth in advertising with actual footage of the behind the scenes processes in the factory farming arenas, and even on the more local independently owned farm levels, could go a long way in helping to educate and decrease the widely accepted and paid for via supermarket purchases cruelty and inhumaneness, in my opinion. But folks who do try to make it known are often met with hatred and ridicule while the ongoing inhumane plight of the animals is still considered "normal" and necessary. It feels like such a twisted reality.

I still suffered major inflammation and swelling, excessive pain, heavy brain fog, skin issues, major mood issues, no energy, gut issues, and couldn't lose any weight while I was still consuming meat, dairy, and eggs, no matter where it was sourced from. I had long since given up red meat, as well, except the occasional deer meat that friends and local hunters would share, and was only doing poultry and some seafood here and there for quite some time.

All of it was from local much "kinder" and cleaner sources, but my body was still trying to tell me to back off, but my taste buds and years of being programmed/taught to believe I HAD to have it daily in some form or fashion eventually gave my body no other choice than to send much stronger emergent signals via becoming mostly bedridden, then the trip to the ER. I finally took it much more seriously and made the drastic shift happen. That seemed less drastic and less expensive than having an organ removed.

I doubt if much will be done about it, either, until more serious animal-borne dis-ease(s) sets in and requires the supply to be cut off in a major way, if that ever happens. But I'm damn glad my body finally let me know what it needed the most, or should I say the least. Just like no one ever taught me how to breathe in a way that benefits my well-being, they also didn't teach me how to eat and hydrate in a way that truly nurtures my being. The most basic of things I needed to know to more healthily and comfortably exist had to first be totally unlearned so I could teach myself all over again. What a trip it's been, and continues to be.
 
#82
People do have to eat, for sure @TruthSeeker , but they don't HAVE to eat animal products, especially not as much or as often as they're typically consumed here in the US. We truly are what we eat, and what the animals we eat eats, and are injected with, and the experiences they endure. Everything we do is an energetic exchange. Every body is also very different, so I can't speak for anyone but myself and my direct experience. I was hardcore convinced I'd die without it, or at the least, be totally miserable and missing out on taste, but eventually learned just the opposite.

I had already shifted my habits into eating only the local "humanely" raised/killed meats, too, until I realized humane and slaughter don't fit together in my head or heart, no matter how I tried to twist it to make sense. The so called "happy cow" dairy industry, as well, is anything but humane. As well as the so called "cage-free" egg industry.

I realized fish marinate in their own toilet all day every day, as well as all the crap us humans pollute the waters with. Yum. Not. Marketing terminology and commercial advertisements make it easier for many to never look beyond grocery aisles, though. When many do choose to take a peek, they realize it's probably best to just not know. I tried to ignore it for a while, but decided to visit each arena personally. It was overwhelming in many regards. I learned if we can't handle seeing/doing the process, we likely shouldn't partake in the product, especially as a repeated trauma survivor. That made it hit home even harder for me.

They have pick your own berries/pumpkins/apples/etc., but I haven't seen any slit your own steak or burger's throat/behead and pluck your own chickens/come on over and "humanely" butcher your own pig for your bacon/or come forcibly impregnate your own cow then take it's calf away so you humans can have all its milk for your coffee, cereal, yogurt, and cheese, instead, and go ahead and slaughter the calf, too, if it's male, so you can have a side of veal/and don't forget to kill the little lambs along the way.

Blatant truth in advertising with actual footage of the behind the scenes processes in the factory farming arenas, and even on the more local independently owned farm levels, could go a long way in helping to educate and decrease the widely accepted and paid for via supermarket purchases cruelty and inhumaneness, in my opinion. But folks who do try to make it known are often met with hatred and ridicule while the ongoing inhumane plight of the animals is still considered "normal" and necessary. It feels like such a twisted reality.

I still suffered major inflammation and swelling, excessive pain, heavy brain fog, skin issues, major mood issues, no energy, gut issues, and couldn't lose any weight while I was still consuming meat, dairy, and eggs, no matter where it was sourced from. I had long since given up red meat, as well, except the occasional deer meat that friends and local hunters would share, and was only doing poultry and some seafood here and there for quite some time.

All of it was from local much "kinder" and cleaner sources, but my body was still trying to tell me to back off, but my taste buds and years of being programmed/taught to believe I HAD to have it daily in some form or fashion eventually gave my body no other choice than to send much stronger emergent signals via becoming mostly bedridden, then the trip to the ER. I finally took it much more seriously and made the drastic shift happen. That seemed less drastic and less expensive than having an organ removed.

I doubt if much will be done about it, either, until more serious animal-borne dis-ease(s) sets in and requires the supply to be cut off in a major way, if that ever happens. But I'm damn glad my body finally let me know what it needed the most, or should I say the least. Just like no one ever taught me how to breathe in a way that benefits my well-being, they also didn't teach me how to eat and hydrate in a way that truly nurtures my being. The most basic of things I needed to know to more healthily and comfortably exist had to first be totally unlearned so I could teach myself all over again. What a trip it's been, and continues to be.
I can't get enough protein and calcium in a vegan diet... given my health issues....and I eat a lot of beans...but I'd be eating all day to make just 50 grams of protein a day w/o meat and then I have to get in enough fiber. I have malabsorption issues....so, meat is a must...for me to avoid anemia.
 
#83
Yup. As I said, every body is different. I'm incredibly grateful I don't have any physical hurdles that force me to feel like I must partake. May your particular issues remain healthily under control, @TruthSeeker .

I had friends who were greatly concerned that I'd very likely become anemic after giving meat up, but having my blood work done regularly, while requesting additional hormone/vitamin/mineral levels as most typically ordered testing doesn't cover those arenas, have luckily shown more drastic improvements than most professionals I was seeing at the time imagined were possible. The numbers remain in good standing after almost 6 years, thankfully. (knock on wood)

The friend who helped me with my transition shared the following article regarding anemia during the time I had been made to greatly fear that becoming an issue:

Vegan Diet And Risk Of Anemia: Truths, Myths, And What To Do

I also gave up all caffeine, alcohol, gluten, highly processed foods the same time I kicked the meat, dairy, and eggs to the curb, and in my favorite coffee replacement, roasted dandelion root tea, I'd add a tsp. of blackstrap molasses.

Whatever vegan combinations I've learned to nurture myself with over the years, in addition to the supplements I take, have so far worked to benefit me greatly rather than deplete. May it healthily stay that way.

Speaking of meat sales and such, this crossed my path today. Gee, you mean one of the alphabet agencies would mislead their consumers? (said with heavy sarcastic overtones - after having uncovered many nightmarish scenes in my own journey of alphabet agency induced horrors - not all of which were/are food related)...

USDA admits it may be misleading consumers with 'Product of USA' labeling | Food Safety News
 
#84
I agree with this one wholeheartedly, and then some.

My entire being benefits from nature time, be it standing barefoot in the grass, taking the camera for a walk to capture awe-inspiring moments, sitting by a flowing mountain stream, hugging trees, watching wildlife, hearing birds sing, watching bees do their dance between the flowers, soaking up sun, dancing in the rain and splashing in puddles, enjoying the peace and quiet of snow, planting edible goodies to nurture cell-ph and others with and being part of a growth process, etc., etc.

The means and methods can vary greatly, yet the benefits continue to be immense....

Ecopsychology: How Immersion in Nature Benefits Your Health
 
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