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Ask a foreigner

Question open to anyone here - have no idea if calling someone famous a National Treasure happens all round the world or not but I'm sure the notion of it must if not with that label.

So a national treasure is a famous person really loved by the people in your country. Who is one in your country? Do you like em and why?
 
So a national treasure is a famous person really loved by the people in your country.
Our country is too big and we have too many celebrities for everyone to agree that a particular person is a "national treasure." Also, culture is our main export, so our culture is also everyone else's, whether they like it or not.

I guess pretty much everyone likes Tom Hanks though. And Beyonce.
 
So a national treasure is a famous person really loved by the people in your country. Who is one in your country? Do you like em and why?
Sir Peter Jackson, for sure.
For his creative vision, humility, and what he has done for our country.

Richie McCaw -- ex-captain of the All Blacks (our national rugby team). Actually a lot of All Blacks and ex All Blacks are national treasure; that team is probably the single thing most New Zealanders feel most patriotic about.

Valarie Adams -- one of our most successful Olympic and Commonwealth Games athletes.
 
Question open to anyone here - have no idea if calling someone famous a National Treasure happens all round the world or not but I'm sure the notion of it must if not with that label.

So a national treasure is a famous person really loved by the people in your country. Who is one in your country? Do you like em and why?
We don’t have them, here, as I know them.

Where I lived in Japan it was something people both aspired to and avoided like the plague... because once you became a national treasure? You became property of the govt., rather than a citizen with the rights, protections, & privileges of a person. A great honor, AND a great sacrifice.
 
Where I lived in Japan it was something people both aspired to and avoided like the plague... because once you became a national treasure? You became property of the govt., rather than a citizen with the rights, protections, & privileges of a person.

That's very interesting, do you know the term used in Japan? Or someone that was considered it? Would like to look it up
 
Balogna makes me barf.
:D
What does it taste like?

Reason I'm interested is a book I read in my teens - long before the internet, The Outsiders by SE Hinton. In it the main character was hiding out in a barn for a few weeks and for a while had only jars of baloney to eat. He wasn't very happy about it and I've always been curious what it was like!. I used to think it might be like picallili.
 
:D
What does it taste like?

Reason I'm interested is a book I read in my teens - long before the internet, The Outsiders by SE Hinton. In it the main character was hiding out in a barn for a few weeks and for a while had only jars of baloney to eat. He wasn't very happy about it and I've always been curious what it was like!. I used to think it might be like picallili.
Bologna sausage - Wikipedia

It's this .
 
That's very interesting, do you know the term used in Japan? Or someone that was considered it? Would like to look it up
Yep. The term is actually “National Treasure” or “Living National Treasure”. It’s similar to being Knighted.

Japan has a loooooooong history of kidnapping (liberating, repatriating) Korean (& Chinese/etc., but mostly Korean) artists and scientists/mathematicians/etc. The idea, as we were taught in school, is that all great minds were -of course- Japanese, or of Japanese descent. (Japan is an exceptionally racist country.) CLEARLY these artisans in other countries were the descendants of Japanese citizens living on the mainland when the empire extended that far in, or the bastards of soldiers/sailors during various wars abroad, etc., and deserved to be rescued from their lesser lives abroad and brought “home” to serve the emperor. Only the best and brightest maintained their Japanese-ness after the unfortunate contamination of being born and raised in lesser lands and cultures..., and were under armed guard “for their protection” once they were brought “home” for the rest of their natural lives. Following WWII and the massive devastation -and waves of emmigration- that brought? The native born best and brightest were ALSO given the same “protections” in an attempt to preserve vital cultural heritage during the occupation of foreign troops and western influx. It’s very rare that living national treasures are allowed contact, much less travel, outside of very circumscribed and govt. sanctioned livings. It’s a tremendous honor, as a westerner, to be allowed to even see displays of a National treasure’s work, much less the person themselves. Even online, there may just be one or two pieces allowed to be photographed or filmed and uploaded. It’s a difficulty the govt. has, in promoting interest in citizens, whilst discouraging foreign interest. There were any number of school field trips where the other foreign kids and I had to wait in courtyards, or across the street, whilst the Japanese students were taken to exhibitions. Because we weren’t worthy of the honor. It was always vey exciting when we were actually allowed to attend (my mom usually managed to be a chaperone on those trips! :hilarious: ), or at least the adults thought so. As a kid I was usually more inclined to be disallowed, so I could play with the extended freedom of the chaperone who felt so badly for us not being good enough to be allowed in. It usually meant ice cream & running around, rather than being on best behavior and suspicious glares.
 
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only jars of baloney to eat. H

Lots of us grew up eating white bread, American cheese, mustard and bologna sandwiches. The ultimate non-food American lunch! :laugh: Bologna and hot dogs are both made with processed leftover pig parts (snout, feet, lips, you name it). My mom taught at a culinary school and I got to see them mad when I was in high school ---- haven't been able to eat it since no idea how you would jar or can it....maybe pickled? ?

Gal I worked with was from NZ....she can't stand peanut butter, which is another lunch staple here. She used to gag making her kids lunches because they grew up on it so of course thats what they wanted :laugh:
 
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