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Sufferer C-PTSD/PTSD Dissociative Subtype-seeking what is normal exactly for sufferers.

J

JellyBeanEssie

Hey all! I was diagnosed at the age of 20 with PTSD and years later it was changed to C-PTSD, but here in the states it is referred to officially as PTSD Dissociative Subtype. I also have diagnosis’s for anxiety (GAD), Treatment Resistant Depression, ADHD, and was misdiagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Type II when I was younger. Apparently those last two were thrown out for the C-PTSD. I am seeing a psychologist to rule out any dissociative disorders.
The issue I am starting to have with this disorder is, how do we know which of our symptoms are a result of our trauma (C-PTSD) or symptoms of other diagnosis’s. Is there an actual master list of agreed upon symptoms for C-PTSD?
 
Hey all! I was diagnosed at the age of 20 with PTSD and years later it was changed to C-PTSD, but here in the states it is referred to officially as PTSD Dissociative Subtype. I also have diagnosis’s for anxiety (GAD), Treatment Resistant Depression, ADHD, and was misdiagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Type II when I was younger. Apparently those last two were thrown out for the C-PTSD. I am seeing a psychologist to rule out any dissociative disorders.
The issue I am starting to have with this disorder is, how do we know which of our symptoms are a result of our trauma (C-PTSD) or symptoms of other diagnosis’s. Is there an actual master list of agreed upon symptoms for C-PTSD?
Hello there! Welcome to the peer-to-peer community here at myptsd.com. It's great to have you here with us. I can understand how challenging it can be to navigate the complexities of different diagnoses and symptoms.

When it comes to distinguishing between symptoms of trauma-related disorders, like C-PTSD, and symptoms of other diagnoses, it can indeed be tricky. Each person's experience with C-PTSD is unique, and the symptoms can vary widely from individual to individual.

While there isn't an official "master list" of symptoms for C-PTSD that everyone agrees upon, there are common symptoms that many individuals with C-PTSD experience. These may include recurring traumatic memories or nightmares, feeling detached from oneself or others, heightened startle response, emotional dysregulation, persistent negative beliefs about oneself or the world, difficulties with relationships, and various physical symptoms.

It's important to remember that C-PTSD can often coexist with other mental health conditions, creating a complex web of symptoms. Proper diagnosis and ongoing support from mental health professionals can help in understanding and managing these symptoms. Collaborating with your therapist or psychologist can be helpful in determining which symptoms may be related to trauma and which may be related to other diagnoses.

Here at myptsd.com, our community members have a wealth of personal experiences, coping strategies, and insights. So feel free to explore and connect with others who understand what you're going through. We also encourage seeking professional help and engaging in therapy sessions for a comprehensive approach to healing.

Please know that we have specific forums dedicated to various topics related to PTSD and C-PTSD, such as symptoms, treatments, and managing daily life. These forums can provide you with valuable information and a safe space to discuss your concerns.

Thank you for sharing a bit about your journey, and please don't hesitate to reach out if you have any more questions or if there's anything else we can do to support you.
 
Welcome to the forum!

You’ll find that with complex PTSD, a lot of folks have layers of anxiety and/or depression at something approaching clinical levels going along with that. Having a trauma-informed therapist is valuable, because it becomes less relevant which is which. Once you pull apart what’s happening for you personally, and how your history of trauma plays into that, it gives you a good basis to launch some pretty solid therapy from.

And even before getting that far? Your essential coping and grounding skills, so you can do that therapy (and get through it) will improve all 3 of those types of pathology:)
 
hello jellybean. welcome to the forum. sorry for what brings here but glad you are here.
The issue I am starting to have with this disorder is, how do we know which of our symptoms are a result of our trauma (C-PTSD) or symptoms of other diagnosis’s. Is there an actual master list of agreed upon symptoms for C-PTSD?
i started therapy in 1972 when combat ptsd was still being called, "shell shock" and bipolar was still being called, "manic depression." my official dx of manic depression morphed into bipolar without much notice, accumulating a psychosmorgasbord of sub-dx'es to explain the peripheral symptoms until the turn of the millennium when the ptsd dx became available. as i work to translate the life saving (literally) therapy i received in the throwaway kid camps of the 70's to the contemporary ptsd officialiality, i often wonder if i am currently suffering PDD. psychiatric disorder disorder. is that a trigger or **just** a reminder? am i reliving bygone events or responding erratically to current day stresses. sigh. . . by whatever name, it has been a disorderly ride.

there are lots and lots of "actual master lists." i don't believe experts are famous for agreeing on much of anything. living, breathing mental illnesses are even less famous for agreeing with master lists. methinks my own take on it is that i share your confusion. maybe we can figure ^it^ out together.

welcome to the forum. i hope you find stabilizing companionship here. you are not alone.
 
was misdiagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Type II when I was younger. Apparently those last two were thrown out for the C-PTSD
Also ADHD & Bipolar disorder cannot exist in the same person.

The easiest way to explain why? Stimulants smooth people with ADHD out, but kick bipolar people into manic episodes; meanwhile Bipolar meds (mood stabilizers, antidepressants, & antipsychotics) cause psychosis, depression, and dysregulated mood in people with ADHD. IE VERY SIMILAR SYMPTOMS with opposite reactions to the same meds. 2 different disorders. The GAD & MDD may also easily be explained away by ADHD+PTSD, as ADHD emotions are big swingers like bipolar (but can also shut off from time to time all sociopathy), and PTSD/trauma gets Rollercoastery as hell. Doesn’t mean it’s definite, by any means, just incrediably common amongst the ADHD+PTSD subgroup to have Uber more anxiety/depression than one would usually find with PTSD by itself.

Similarly? If you have ADHD your disassociation scores are gonna top charts, with PTSD. As disassociation is a core component of ADHD (it’s what allows hyperfocus to happen, as well as a sanity saving break from overactive senses). <<< Merge that with even super normal level PTSD disassociation? <low whistle> It gets SERIOUSLY zoned out, flashbacky, et al. In major, major ways.

Welcome to the community! 🤠 From another ADHD+PTSD peep.
 
Welcome Jellybean!
Sounds pretty standard for Complex PTSD.
Usually comes with a whole raft of other crap to deal with.
I am in about the same boat as you and managing your day to day is a way better goal than normal. There's a ton of help here for doing that.

Hope you find help and community here!
 
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