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Why am I now scared of random things not related to my trauma?

Allyb190

New Here
I’m New here and I’m desperate for answers.

I’m now scared of things that have no relation to my trauma. ( first responder)
I’m scared of the wind.
I’m scared of driving around corners in the car
I don’t know why this is happening, I feel like I’m slowly losing my independence.
Even if I’m only going slow around a corner, I feel for a second like I’m going to pass out just like the other trauma related attacks
Can’t breath feel like I’m holding onto an electric fence etc.

I need help
I need to know if this is normal?
 
I wonder if you could be misnaming how you’re feeling. It sounds like hypervigilance which would cause me major anxiety when I was at peak symptom. My phone ringing or even the chime it makes for a message was pushing me over the edge. Even if someone in public had theirs ring it would cause my whole body to vibrate for a length of time.

So in my case it wasn’t fear but my body responded as if I was afraid. For me noises were the ultimate issue and so I stayed clear of them until I had a better grip on my response. Not sure if that’s helpful or not.
 
I wonder if you could be misnaming how you’re feeling. It sounds like hypervigilance which would cause me major anxiety when I was at peak symptom. My phone ringing or even the chime it makes for a message was pushing me over the edge. Even if someone in public had theirs ring it would cause my whole body to vibrate for a length of time.

So in my case it wasn’t fear but my body responded as if I was afraid. For me noises were the ultimate issue and so I stayed clear of them until I had a better grip on my response. Not sure if that’s helpful or not.
I feel fine driving any other time it’s just the corners that get me.
All of a sudden I feel like the car is going to roll or I’m going to die, then it’s straight back to normal.
I’m fine with corners if my partner is driving.
 
It’s SUPER normal, with PTSD, that the more we avoid one thing? The more dozens/hundreds/thousands of other things start popping up. Making lives smaller, and smaller, and smaller.

That said?

You’re also describing an inner ear infection.

So I’d see if a course of antibiotics brings things back to rights, for you.
 
@Allyb190, I began to have trouble post-trauma where I felt like I was going to hit a curb on the right side when pulling into a parking spot. Major stomach clenching & feeling something terrible was about to happen.

My trauma had nothing to do with cars, so it seemed completely random, like you said. I'm still working on it; in my case, it helps if I'm the driver, so I've taken over driving when my husband and I are in the car. I guess I'm trying to desensitize myself. I also the exercises for releasing trauma in Liz Stanley's book, Widening the Window, which help. She trains first responders & military folks primarily, you might find her book helpful.
 
I belive this is something many people experience. I have experienced it myself after wittnessing two robberies. Therapy is being very helpful with it, but just being outside is very scary, I'm now scared of anything and everything outside of my home. The only thing that works for me is to have someone by my side when I'm outside. I know it feels like you're not being yourself or like you're never gonna get through this, but try to remember the times when the fear is not so big, when you're calm or relaxed.
 
I can completely relate to this. My therapist said its very common when we've felt so unable to control things in a traumatic event, that the world can then seem a scary place. Maybe because you can't see around that corner immediately is triggering a feeling of not being in full control, and therefore heightening your anxiety and fear of the unknown? Might be something worth exploring with a therapist, but please know you're not alone and these things can be quite "normal" for many of us. The right therapy can help hugely though, so please don't worry that it will always be this way x
 
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