Vegan Safe Space

Sideways

Sponsor
Vegetarians don't eat meat.

Vegans don't eat meat, or food products that contain products from animals (like dairy products).

More broadly, vegans try and avoid products (beyond food products) that have been produced in a way that involves cruelty to animals, or exploitation of animals.

You'll find that unlike vegetarianism, which has a nice clear line of what they will and won't eat, there's some variation from one vegan to the next, on how far they take their ethical objections (for example, whether they limit it to food, whether they object to things like honey, whether they include cosmetics, which is very common, and clothing, which is less common, etc.)

As an ethical concept, veganism doesn't have firm boundaries. Individuals choose for themselves how far to apply the ethical issues in their own consumption choices.

So, with some vegans, you'll often find crossovers into other ethical areas: for example if a certain product is known to be produced by land-clearing rainforest areas like the Amazon, if a certain company routinely tests products on animals vegans may avoid all that company's products, and companies that are known to produce their products in ways that exploit humans (particularly child workers), some vegans will avoid their products as well.
 
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knuckles

MyPTSD Pro
Made a nice bowl of raspberry-nice cream with fresh fruits, nuts and a little chocolate for toppings. Felt like kind self-care. Need this today.
Made a vegan chili con carne (chili sin carne?) two days ago (based on a recipe from itdoesnttastelikechicken.com). I liked it. Still do :) Stumbled on a flax seed wrap recipe while browsing youtube last night. Decided to try it out today and have them with the rest of the chili con carne (what doesn't go into the freezer) and that last bit of cabbage that's sitting in the fridge and whatever else I can come up with. Looking forward to that :)
 

Tornadic Thoughts

MyPTSD Pro
I saw this today and thought others here who would like to find more vegan options while out and about may find it helpful. So far, I've only looked at the pdf they offer, titled The Ultimate Vegan Guide 9.9.20 - and it's for US restaurants, but some options may be available elsewhere:

Dead Link Removed
 

Changing4Best

MyPTSD Pro
What's the first thing that I can change in my diet, that should bring me closer to being vegan? Just one thing. I rarely eat meat, but I hate cooking, because my stove is unlevel, my mother taught me very little about cooking and I'm a finicky eater.
 

Tornadic Thoughts

MyPTSD Pro
It's hard to answer with "just one thing", for me, anyway, @Changing4Best . It eventually becomes simple, from how I experienced it based on emergent medical needs I could no longer ignore, but that doesn't mean it's easy. I encourage people to start by adding more veggies, especially greens, rather than spending energy focusing on what you'll feel like you'll be missing.

Then keep introducing more plants with each trip to the grocery store and eventually each meal, like cruciferous veggies, fruits, seeds, nuts, legumes, plant-based milks (oat is my favorite), etc., and increase the amount of times you consume them. Keep an eye out for the "ugly table" (reduced items) in the produce section, and the close-outs and reduced items in other areas of the store. Frozen veggies sometimes get reduced to incredible bargain prices, too. It takes an investment of time, energy, commitment, and sustained interest, for sure, but don't let the thought of that overwhelm your attempts. I call it the grocery tour when I'm seeking the best deals via the online weekly circulars and digital coupons, etc..

With any luck, you'll grow to enjoy the things you add well enough that the other less healthy stuff will naturally get cast aside as you learn to create healthier versions of things you enjoy, as well as new stuff. Seasonings make a huge difference. Watch beginner vegan videos/seek out the beginner shopping lists/seek the "cheap and lazy" and/or "quick and easy" methods for ideas.

I would get the stove leveled out ASAP if that's the main thing stopping you from trying to cook. There's a lot of vegan alternatives, but the highly processed stuff is packed with chemical shit storms and often have an incredibly high sodium content that make them anything but healthy, in my opinion, and from direct experience. It's also a lot more expensive than whole food options/rice/beans/tofu/etc.

Get maintenance to come take care of that stove for you (if I remember correctly, you're in an apartment - please forgive me if I got that wrong). There's a ton of you tube vids to help with basic and beginner instructions for vegan meals/snacks/etc. - just google what your preferences are, and add "vegan version" to the search engine, that suit your finicky tastes and go from there.

Or invest in a toaster oven, rice cooker, air fryer, crock pot, insta pot, etc. They're often found in thrift shops or online via craigslist/marketplace/etc., but then there's the issue with having space for all of that - making the stove that's already there a much more space-friendly and wallet-friendly option.

This article might help a bit. Best wishes in finding a groove that works for you:

 

Changing4Best

MyPTSD Pro
It's hard to answer with "just one thing", for me, anyway, @Changing4Best . It eventually becomes simple, from how I experienced it based on emergent medical needs I could no longer ignore, but that doesn't mean it's easy. I encourage people to start by adding more veggies, especially greens, rather than spending energy focusing on what you'll feel like you'll be missing.

Then keep introducing more plants with each trip to the grocery store and eventually each meal, like cruciferous veggies, fruits, seeds, nuts, legumes, plant-based milks (oat is my favorite), etc., and increase the amount of times you consume them. Keep an eye out for the "ugly table" (reduced items) in the produce section, and the close-outs and reduced items in other areas of the store. Frozen veggies sometimes get reduced to incredible bargain prices, too. It takes an investment of time, energy, commitment, and sustained interest, for sure, but don't let the thought of that overwhelm your attempts. I call it the grocery tour when I'm seeking the best deals via the online weekly circulars and digital coupons, etc..

With any luck, you'll grow to enjoy the things you add well enough that the other less healthy stuff will naturally get cast aside as you learn to create healthier versions of things you enjoy, as well as new stuff. Seasonings make a huge difference. Watch beginner vegan videos/seek out the beginner shopping lists/seek the "cheap and lazy" and/or "quick and easy" methods for ideas.

I would get the stove leveled out ASAP if that's the main thing stopping you from trying to cook. There's a lot of vegan alternatives, but the highly processed stuff is packed with chemical shit storms and often have an incredibly high sodium content that make them anything but healthy, in my opinion, and from direct experience. It's also a lot more expensive than whole food options/rice/beans/tofu/etc.

Get maintenance to come take care of that stove for you (if I remember correctly, you're in an apartment - please forgive me if I got that wrong). There's a ton of you tube vids to help with basic and beginner instructions for vegan meals/snacks/etc. - just google what your preferences are, and add "vegan version" to the search engine, that suit your finicky tastes and go from there.

Or invest in a toaster oven, rice cooker, air fryer, crock pot, insta pot, etc. They're often found in thrift shops or online via craigslist/marketplace/etc., but then there's the issue with having space for all of that - making the stove that's already there a much more space-friendly and wallet-friendly option.

This article might help a bit. Best wishes in finding a groove that works for you:

I found some almond milk, which is great as my dentist says no nuts, they break your teeth. I've experienced that too, so I know he's right. Here's to veggies!
 
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