Other Severe lack of trust in medicine and healthcare "professionals"

whiteraven

MyPTSD Pro
Maybe easier for them to figure out what's wrong @whiteraven ?
Or they feel more compelled to DO something, to try something new, since things haven't worked to this point. Even in crisis mode, my issues tend to be complex. But the doctors, etc...I've worked with seem to be thrown a little (pushed out of the box, so to speak) when confronted with something with an immediate need.
 

Rosebud

MyPTSD Pro
Acrually @whiteraven , have you considered them to be better-than-average drs? Because out here, if things don't work they send you home or throw up their hands, for the most part lol.

I'm afraid to go if it's not critical and obvious, so they can feasily figure it out, or I expect them not to take it seriously, or I feel like I'm making something out of nothing/ little.
 

Freddyt

MyPTSD Pro
What I find really interesting with doctors is that they are actually more motivated to come up with an answer that works for you if you go in "on a gurney"
Ain't that the truth! I have learned that when I have an Addison's crisis, call the ambulance. Despite the fact I generally only need a fluid fill up, and a shock dose of hydro-cortisone if you go in an ambulance you don't wait until the dead of night for help and get out of emerg before 3 am.

Sadly far to many people here (The Great White North) abuse the socialized medicine system and go to emerg for every boo boo. GP's are so used to people coming in for problems they can see, that's what they treat. Unless you get involved and push them to it they fix results and not the cause. Be blunt. When you challenge a doctor that way the first thing they see is you going to another doctor and malpractice insurance costs going up.
 

whiteraven

MyPTSD Pro
have you considered them to be better-than-average drs? Because out here, if things don't work they send you home or throw up their hands, for the most part lol.
No, I don't. Typically, that's what happens here, too. Or you get treated using something that they've tried multiple times in the past that didn't work.

I think when you wait until your issue is critical (or, with regard to mental health, if you talk about killing yourself), they are responsive either because they don't want to get sued, or they are kicked into high gear and *finally* realize something may actually be wrong. I don't think it should have to come to that before they do something.
I'm afraid to go if it's not critical and obvious, so they can feasily figure it out, or I expect them not to take it seriously, or I feel like I'm making something out of nothing/ little.
Yep.

Unless you get involved and push them to it they fix results and not the cause. Be blunt. When you challenge a doctor that way the first thing they see is you going to another doctor and malpractice insurance costs going up.
I have a degree in nursing and have always been straightforward and blunt and asked a lot of questions. They HATE it. They would much rather I keep my mouth shut, act stupid, and just do what they say.
 

Rosebud

MyPTSD Pro
I don't think it should have to come to that before they do something.
^^ Me neither. It doesn't, with a great doctor.
They HATE it. They would much rather I keep my mouth shut, act stupid, and just do what they say.
Again, only from the poor(er) ones. I had the pleasure under very unpleasnt circumstances, for example, to get to know a transplant surgeon who was sweet, brilliant, humble, and just a doll. He did a surgery for 5 1/2 hours and a team of 32, that should have taken 30 minutes. He chose to and was able to resuscitate a relative (he didn't play God); he would come in around the clock 24/7; he let you call him at home (and his wife was just as sweet); he would do menial things to save you from doing them like calling the pharmacy; he answered all questions honestly, including saying he didn't know (my relative was a nurse for a lifetime and worked for some of the best physicians in the world- sadly she didn't come with one to Australia, when he asked her to, lol, but I suppose I wouldn't have been born); he was just as quick to tickle the patient's feet or make jokes as he was to be 100% meticulous; he got my relative in in 2 days with a waiting list of months; his staff said he was WONDERFUL to work for ('with'), and they said they all were afraid they'd lose him to the U.S. as it was 10x the money; he agreed eventually to live in a city he hated to accomodate patients on both side of the border; he could never go more than 20 minutes outside of the city I live in for vacation since he was on call 24/7/365, and he did this all for 170K a year. (And I shouldn't have to add, but yet I do- we were not preferentially placed because of wealth, or notoriety, or afluence, or age, or anything that would distinguish her/ us as people of any position or power or influence or prestige). A few years later, I heard when the worlwide success rate was 69%, he led the world with 84%. Now that, is one hell of a person, and doctor, IMHO. It exists, but precious to find. And if you get someone like that, it is One Great Gift, no matter what the outcome.

And I think the same holds true for every profession, every great need.

ETA, but as uphill a battle this has been for you, you have been accomplishing it. And they wouldn't admit it, I think, but they are learning from you too.
 
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whiteraven

MyPTSD Pro
And if you get someone like that, it is One Great Gift, no matter what the outcome.
Oh yes. That's really awesome. I think these kind of doctors are few and far between. I did have a neurologist many, many years ago who was very kind and treated me like family (or as I suspect family ought to be) - he and his wife invited me to their home for Bible study (there was the definite feel he was trying to convert me, but he was quite nice about it. LOL He did some hurtful things, but he was the kind I could be very blunt with and he often listened.

Thanks for the reminder!

I guess I've just had poor doctors. I've been treated, though, by some of the best in the country (the surgeon that did my brain surgery was absolute tops in his field, and he refused to talk to me because I was a nurse and "ask[ed] too many questions." He also ended up doing something during surgery we hadn't discussed, and the only way I knew was after reading my operative report). But...*shrug*
 

Rosebud

MyPTSD Pro
I think 'the best' should include more than intellect and technique. Because it's humans not objects in their care.

Wow. You are very forgiving. But I hope and trust you get the right people/ person that you need. Because respect and honesty is critical, too.

Hang in there! 🤗🤗🤗
 

J_trustno1

MyPTSD Pro
I completely hear you. I believe the entire medical, physio, psychology and pharmaceuticals business is just a scam. They hook you on a pill and if that doesn't work they will find another one. They do no try to understand what the patient actually needs. I've been seeing their stupidity over last 18 years. Gone through several misdiagnosis. Initially went to a GP for insomnia at the age of 16, she diagnosed me with depression and hooked me on antidepressants. Once you have been diagnosed with depression, then every illness or injury you have is automatically related to a mental illness. This is how far their logic and stupidity goes. If they run a private practice they will keep booking appointments for you so they can milk extra $$$ out of the client, insurances or government facilities on your behalf. Five minutes of texting from a psychologist is charged for an hour on a clients name. This is how bizarre it gets.
Wish I could be of any help. I'm going through the same thing but with an injury.
 
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