Anyone here who suspects a genetic aspect to their anxiety?

Applecore

Learning
It's an opinion, and it's getting off topic. Let's stay on point!

You are right, I agree that I used hyperbole to express an opinion. The point is that America abnormally prescribes medication compared to what is normal for the rest of the world. On the topic of anxiety and medication, that is highly relevant to American people who are suffering from anxiety and have been prescribed medication. Thinking outside one's immediate environment, also known as getting some perspective, often helps.
 

PlainJane

Moderator
Mod Note:

On the topic of anxiety and medication, that is highly relevant to American people who are suffering from anxiety and have been prescribed medication.

This is not highly relevant to the topic the OP is addressing. If the topic you are discussing interests you enough to further comment on it, please make a separate thread to discuss the issues pertaining to the ethics of prescribing medication.

Any questions or concerns please address them here.

Back to the thread...

i go back and forth on whether it is nature, nurture or a combination of the two, but i have nary a doubt there is a strong family connection.

This is where I stand, um wobble. I couldn't tell you if I would have anxiety or not if my environment was ideal, I still have the predisposed risk factors. I also don't know if my relatives have anxiety, I just assume.
 

enough

MyPTSD Pro
genetic aspect anxiety? yes.
My father called me a belly-acher, accused me of seeking sympathy, told me to "be a man" when I was literally sick to my stomache and other forms of ill all during grade school. I liked school, excelled in fact. looking back it was social anxiety, probably from being criticized so heavily by one of the 3 other people in my home, then going to a situation where there were hundreds of strangers, 33.3 % of whom were probably secretly criticizing me all of the time.
later in life, i found out that he had missed most of his early school mondays out sick, and then in high school he was elected senior class president but missed a lot of friday and friday night activities.
Genetics? maybe. Made me tougher? that would be nurture and I don't give him credit for that, escaping his home at 14 was a cure for any weaknesses. I think he had the same dispensation to anxiety and his father definitely pushed it to an unbearable level, as did mine. I let my son be a kid and he is a great dad. Enough.
 

Hallowean

Not Active
I think most people have some amount of depression, anxiety, etc (esp in this time we are living as you said)...but I think some people are just better at hiding/dealing with it. A family I know lost a member to suicide, 2 close family members both have pancreatic cancer now, they have their own health problems, but they keep on trudging on and enjoying life. I asked the man once how he deals with everything and his answer was "God".
 

Weemie

MyPTSD Pro
I believe so. I have/had an extremely rare disorder (RAD) that not a lot of research has been done on in the progression to adulthood. While this has an environmental cause (extreme infant neglect) most babies don't develop RAD even when in extreme environments. My family has a huge history of mental and physical health problems, autism, ADHD, schizophrenia, BPD, NPD and also there are genetic anomalies due to incest. I definitely suspect if this wasn't the case I would not have RAD and the likelihood of other mh and substance abuse disorders would be lowered.
 

EveHarrington

MyPTSD Pro
Not genetic but more likely learned..... All those examples, all those people, you learn from them all when you are young. You learn how you should be. When all those people help add to your anxiety and show it as an example, why should you be different.......

The study of epigenetics shows that trauma effects can be passed down through 6 generations. This was a study in rats. Science is saying that there is coding in our genes (or rather “above” our genes) that passes it down through generations. It’s not just about learned behavior.
 

Applecore

Learning
The study of epigenetics shows that trauma effects can be passed down through 6 generations. This was a study in rats. Science is saying that there is coding in our genes (or rather “above” our genes) that passes it down through generations. It’s not just about learned behavior.

What proportion of the population do we suppose would be at the end of hereditary chain that hasn't had experiences of trauma throughout six generations? Six generations being usually well over 100 years of life experiences.
 
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