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Relationship Why is he suddenly feeling disrespected?

Thread starter #25
Well... I am not 100 percent convinced. I am not a medical expert. In my country people are being treated with hydroxycholoroquine early as far as I know and the mortality is at five percent of all known cases. Actually the discussion goes in the direction if treatment with hydroxycholoroquine is really useful but since it is cheap and relatively low risk it is continued.

The mortality of known cases has a strong connection with age where I am from. In the under 50 year olds it is only 0.3 percent - or 3 in thousand. So we are under 50 and most likely we will not die from it.

Yet I think we still should have a say if we want to expose ourselves to the coronavirus, because 0,3 is not nothing. If the state forces my son into school, forces him to sit next to another child he didn’t choose and if the other childs family decides to travel to a corona hotspot it’s basically the state and that other childs family who choose if our child and our family are exposed to the risk.
If 1000 people under 50 are exposed to the risk that way 3 of them will end up dead. I hope that this will not happen to us, chances are it won’t, because 997 won’t die. Chances are also that it is more likely that nobody in his class will have corona.
But I was answering @Ronin here who talked about figuring out reducing the risk. There is not much we can do to reduce our individual risk. It’s basically just coincidence.

My Vets risk may be higher than usual. We don’t know for sure. His employer send him into remote work (we say “home office“ but we are not sure if this is a correct English word) because he has hypertonic and he send everybody who has that condition (or a number of others) into remote work and they currently aren’t allowed to enter the office building. That can be easily done in that kind of job and the employer might be a bit extra careful.
Yet I think for my vet this is a bit like “OMG! The world out there is dangerous for people like me“. Some of his coworkers have returned to the office buildings (the ones who have no health problems were given the choice if they wanted to return or continue to work remote).

People in the office are required to wear a facemask and keep a distance, they also have to switch to remote working when they show symptoms of cough, fever and so on. Yet he still is not allowed to be in there even under that safe conditions. I think it makes him feel a bit like at deaths door.

The corona-mortality for all people with hypertonia is 10 percent as far as I know but that includes the elderly. We assume that the mortality of a young person must be much lower.

He is currently not in his best health, has a lot of stomach trouble, trouble eating. I would have made him see a doctor if he wasn’t to afraid to catch corona there.
Hope he has all the vitamins and so on he needs.

My vet has made bad experiences with illness. A friend of his had severe illness and my vet has made a bad experience in hospital.
He has always been afraid of germs... even before corona he was afraid of germs.
So this is hard for him.
 
#26
@mumstheword ONE study is claiming hydrochloroquine helps, but also states more research is needed to confirm results. Right now pretty much everybody else is disputing their findings... WHO, FDA, CDC, NIH, multiple other countries. I haven’t seen anybody touting it as a miracle treatment except some conservative news outlets.

I even looked on CNN to see if I was missing something.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cn...oroquine-coronavirus-detroit-study/index.html

WHO discontinues hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir treatment arms for COVID-19

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Revokes Emergency Use Authorization for Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine

NIH halts clinical trial of hydroxychloroquine

However, let’s not derail @Never_falter2 ’s post with discussions about COVID. That’s not really the big problem her household is facing. COVID is just the trigger for the problem.
 
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#28
@mumstheword ONE study is claiming hydrochloroquine helps, but also states more research is needed to confirm results. Right now pretty much everybody else is disputing their findings... WHO, FDA, CDC, NIH, multiple other countries. I haven’t seen anybody touting it as a miracle treatment except some conservative news outlets.

I even looked on CNN to see if I was missing something.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cn...oroquine-coronavirus-detroit-study/index.html

WHO discontinues hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir treatment arms for COVID-19

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Revokes Emergency Use Authorization for Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine

NIH halts clinical trial of hydroxychloroquine

However, let’s not derail @Never_falter2’s post with discussions about COVID. That’s not really the big problem her household is facing. COVID is just the trigger for the problem.
My apologies. I have looked into it extensively and I'm not making baseless claims, plus was only trying to alleviate worry and concern but I will butt out and keep my mouth shut, in future. Consider me told.
 
Thread starter #29
I cannot say this in English. I think he has PTSD with Zwangsgedanken (=“OCD thoughts“, so a bit similar to OCD) but his diagnosis is PTSD and actually he wanted to discuss this and was told it was normal in PTSD like you have that kind of thoughts and he always was like “really?“ and then the therapist refused to discuss it with him because she thought it would be no good for him dwelling on this thought but he should embrace the fact he has ptsd... and I think it has been good for him he embraced the fact no, because it helped him see himself as wounded not crazy and this has been so important for him.

***Err, sorry. Let me correct that. Not “I think he has“ but “I think he has been diagnosed with“. I didn’t diagnose him. I think it has been diagnosed ptsd was the root cause for his problems and he has OCD thoughts because of ptsd.

However I think this therapist was not qualified to diagnose anybody (because in my country only a few select therapists are) but still told him that in her view what he was going through was normal for ptsd and that he should try to embrace it while working on it - but basically it’s like part of his story. Like when you have a wound.
 
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#30
@mumstheword ONE study is claiming hydrochloroquine helps, but also states more research is needed to confirm results. Right now pretty much everybody else is disputing their findings... WHO, FDA, CDC, NIH, multiple other countries. I haven’t seen anybody touting it as a miracle treatment except some conservative news outlets.

I even looked on CNN to see if I was missing something.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cn...oroquine-coronavirus-detroit-study/index.html

WHO discontinues hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir treatment arms for COVID-19

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Revokes Emergency Use Authorization for Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine

NIH halts clinical trial of hydroxychloroquine

However, let’s not derail @Never_falter2’s post with discussions about COVID. That’s not really the big problem her household is facing. COVID is just the trigger for the problem.
Oh and let's be clear here, the FDA "revoking emergency use" because I looked into it extensively and watched what was said in the White house briefing when the FDA spokesperson was questioned about it, it was revoked because they had made a stupid ruling that limited doctors ability to prescribe it early, so they were only giving it when people were in the very late stages of the illness, when secondary infections, like pneumonia and sepsis set in, and it's too late to treat people with HCQ then. It works prophylactic and when given in the early stages of the illness, but not in the advanced stages. I've looked into it extensively, like I said. I've watched numerable honest doctors talk about their success rates with it. But don't take my word for it, do your own due diligence. Maybe you CAN prove me wrong, but so far, no you haven't.
 
Thread starter #32
Oh and let's be clear here, the FDA "revoking emergency use" because I looked into it extensively and watched what was said in the White house briefing when the FDA spokesperson was questioned about it, it was revoked because they had made a stupid ruling that limited doctors ability to prescribe it early, so they were only giving it when people were in the very late stages of the illness, when secondary infections, like pneumonia and sepsis set in, and it's too late to treat people with HCQ then. It works prophylactic and when given in the early stages of the illness, but not in the advanced stages. I've looked into it extensively, like I said. I've watched numerable honest doctors talk about their success rates with it. But don't take my word for it, do your own due diligence. Maybe you CAN prove me wrong, but so far, no you haven't.
Well I am it a doctor but I think in my country hydroxychloroquin is given at an early stage of infection. I think sometimes even prophylactic (if someone has been exposed, say there is a COVID outbreak in a meat packing plant and a high number of people working there are tested positive, then the rest will given prophylactic hydroxychloroquine before their test results are back).

However: Our death rate is five percent which probably shows that hydroxychloroquin does not prevent death in every case. Maybe death rate would be ten percent otherwise. Who knows? But still: five percent die... and I think they say the benefit of hydroxychloroquine might be small but it’s relatively safe and it’s very cheap. So they continue using it.

*I wanted to say “I am not a doctor but in my country....“. Sorry. Should have re-read the post before replying.
 
Thread starter #34
No, currently unfortunately he is not seeing anybody.
But yes, she helped him... well, helped him the cruelly way... like made him touch trash, first touch it for a short while, then touch it for longer, then touch even longer and he was not allowed to shower when he came home (and he was freaking out a bit but in the end was successful).
She also helped him to look at things the other way not like “I was in hospital and it was scary. I had a side effect from a medication that scared the f*ck out of me“ but “I was in hospital and fortunately they were able to help me and it turned out that my fears of ending up a paraplegic turned out wrong“ (because he had hurt his back and was afraid that would happen to him) and “next time I experience a side effect from medication I will tell them“.
Basically I told you about his experience in hospital didn’t I? He had to go to hospital because he hurt his back and head (but the head later turned out to be fine) and they put him on a medication Tilidin (which by they way isn’t allowed in the US because it has so many side effects). It’s an opiate medication. Also it turned out he hurt his spine a bit so he wasn’t allowed to move. As far as I understand they wanted to give him a brace that stabilizes the back but did not have it ready because they are individually made for each patient????? (not sure if I understood this correctly because when he told me about his experience I didn’t want to stress him by asking to many questions about stuff). So he had to wait and wait. However he began to habour a fear that he would be a paraplectic. This is was happens I think when your spine breaks (not sure I am not a medical doctor but that’s how I understand and what he understood).

Because of the medication he began having nightmares that were so real that even when he woke he wasn’t sure if it was just a dream, one bring about a thermonuclear war. He also began confusing things with scary things, like was scared of the drip and so on and he saw the dead body of a friend lying there (and the person is not even dead) and of course he knows they have no dead bodies on the hospital floors.
A few times he screamed in terror and when a nurse came he felt pretty stupid, said he doesn’t remember, must have been sleeping and yelling in his sleep and asked if she saw anything unusual.

Because of that he became a bit scared of hospitals, gps and so on (and till this day says he would rather die than having to be on Tilidin again).

However he learned how to see things in a different light... and he learned to cope with his fears.
But I think right now, looking at it from outside, that he is not really coping well with the coronavirus because he cannot use his tools/knowledge for the coronavirus. At least not yet... maybe he’ll find a way... to look at things from another perspective. I think that would be helpful, wouldn’t it?

Right now his perspective is all doom and gloom. That’s bad for the whole family.

What also apart from this doesn’t help is the martialist rhetorics some people/politicians over here use like “We are at war with the virus“ our doctors are “at the frontlines“, we are “the homefront“ and so on.
 
Thread starter #35
Have to add that in the hospital they asked him if he wanted to talk to a clergyman. He said “Yes, please“... well time went on, no clergyman the next day but a lady asked him if he wanted to talk to one and they said he would most likely be there the next day. Next day came but no clergyman, he was told he was in the house and would check after the patients but he never arrived there. My vet was waiting the whole day feeling like “please, please, please... I need to talk to somebody“... but he didn’t tell anybody because he didn’t want to be seen as the patient making a fuss.

Later he talked to a clergyman.
 
#36
Sounds like she did exposure therapy... making him touch trash and all. Did she do much work on *why* he has such an aversion to dirt and germs in the first place?

However he began to habour a fear that he would be a paraplectic. This is was happens I think when your spine breaks (not sure I am not a medical doctor but that’s how I understand and what he understood).
Not necessarily... it depends on where on the spine and how severe of an injury. For instance, my vet had spinal fractures and some nerve damage in his spinal cord, and he’s not a paraplegic.

Right now his perspective is all doom and gloom. That’s bad for the whole family.
That sounds rough. Does he have any good days?

What also apart from this doesn’t help is the martialist rhetorics some people/politicians over here use like “We are at war with the virus“ our doctors are “at the frontlines“, we are “the homefront“ and so on.
I never considered that aspect of this whole thing, or how triggering that could be for vets with combat PTSD.
 
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